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Wine cooler and stand

  • Place of origin:

    Berlin (made)

  • Date:

    1866 (made)

  • Artist/Maker:

    Mantel, Julius Wilhelm, born 1820 - died 1896 (designer)
    Königliche Porzellan-Manufaktur Berlin (manufacturer)

  • Materials and Techniques:

    Partially glazed biscuit porcelain

  • Museum number:

    MISC.123&A-1921

  • Gallery location:

    In Storage

Physical description

A sculptural wine cooler in white, partially glazed biscuit porcelain, with modelling in the form of merfolk on each side and a central dolphin mask back and front. It rests on a black stand with four feet.

Place of Origin

Berlin (made)

Date

1866 (made)

Artist/maker

Mantel, Julius Wilhelm, born 1820 - died 1896 (designer)
Königliche Porzellan-Manufaktur Berlin (manufacturer)

Materials and Techniques

Partially glazed biscuit porcelain

Object history note

In the 1860s the director of the Royal Porcelain Manufactory in Berlin, Georg Kolbe, began to turn towards the Renaissance style, particularly for large ornamental pieces, which "most closely belong in the sphere of fine art". This is apparent here in the merfolk and dolphin masks and the generally sculptural nature of the piece.

Historical context note

Julius Wilhem Mantel (1820-1896) was chief sculptor and modeller to the Royal Porcelain Manufactory in Berlin from 1841 to 1884. He was a pupil of Karl and Ludwig Wichmann, supporters of the neo-classical tradition which lingered on in Berlin longer than anywhere else in Western Europe.

Descriptive line

Partially-glazed biscuit porcelain wine cooler by Julius Wilhelm Mantel, made by the Royal Porcelain Factory, Berlin, 1866. On wooden stand.

Labels and date

'American and European Art and Design 1800-1900'

Julius Wilhem Mantel (1820-1896) was chief sculptor and modeller to the Royal Porcelain Manufactory in Berlin from 1841 to 1884. He was a pupil of Karl and Ludwig Wichmann, supporters of the neo-classical tradition which lingered on in Berlin longer than anywhere else in Western Europe. In the 1860s the factory's director, Georg Kolbe, began to turn towards the Renaissance style, particularly for large ornamental pieces, which "most closely belong in the sphere of fine art". This is apparent here in the merfolk and dolphin masks and the generally sculptural nature of the piece. [1987-2006]

Materials

Porcelain; Biscuit

Techniques

Glazed

Subjects depicted

Dolphin

Categories

Ph-survey; Ceramics; Porcelain; Drinking

Collection

Ceramics Collection

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