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Stove plate

Stove plate

  • Place of origin:

    Germany (made)

  • Date:

    ca. 1600 (made)

  • Artist/Maker:

    Unknown

  • Materials and Techniques:

    Cast iron

  • Museum number:

    319-1897

  • Gallery location:

    In Storage

Iron stoves were probably first developed in fifteenth-century Germany, and gave off significant heat. They consisted of iron plates bolted together and were basically free-standing box-shaped structures which contained the burning fuel.The stove-plates were made in the same way as firebacks, although thinner and lighter. Iron to be used for casting had to be heated to liquid form, which required a very high temperature. The patterns on firebacks and stove-plates were created by pressing one or more pattern-moulds into a bed of sand. After removing the moulds, the liquid iron was then poured in and allowed to cool.

Moulds for firebacks and stove plates were generally made of carved wood. Designs for stoves often depicted Biblical subjects, as on this, which shows the Marriage feast at Cana in Galilee, when Christ turned water into wine ( Gospel of St John, chapter 2).

Physical description

Rectangular, the scene depicted is framed by a raised border, which has two notches on each of the vertical sides.The Biblical scene of the Marriage feast at Cana in Galilee is shown, at which Christ turned water into wine. Twelve fashionably dressed figures are crowded around a laden table, with six flagons in the foreground, and an inscriptionn at the base.

Place of Origin

Germany (made)

Date

ca. 1600 (made)

Artist/maker

Unknown

Materials and Techniques

Cast iron

Marks and inscriptions

HISTORIA.VON.DER. HOCHZEIT. ZU CANA IN GALILEA.JOHAN.2
The story of the wedding at Cana in Galilee. [ Gospel of St.] John, [chapter] 2

Dimensions

Height: 535 mm, Width: 710 mm, Depth: 25 mm

Object history note

Iron stoves were probably first developed in fifteenth- century Germany, and gave off significant heat. They consisted of iron plates bolted together and were basically free-standing box-shaped structures which contained the burning fuel.The stove-plates were made in the same way as firebacks, although thinner and lighter. Iron to be used for casting had to be heated to liquid form, which required a very high temperature The patterns on firebacks were created by pressing one or more pattern-moulds into a bed of sand. After removing the moulds, the liquid iron was then poured in and allowed to cool. Moulds for firebacks were generally made of carved wood.

Historical context note

A number of very similar plaques showing this scene are known, one being incorporated into a large stove at Wilhelmsburg castle, Schalkalden, Germany, see Campbell 1997, pl. 119

Descriptive line

Stove-plate, cast iron, Germany, ca. 1600, showing the Biblical scene of the Marriage Feast at Cana in Galilee

Bibliographic References (Citation, Note/Abstract, NAL no)

fig.59, p.10
Campbell, Marian. An Introduction to Ironwork. London: Her Majesty's Stationery Office, 1985. 48 p., ill. ISBN 0112904157
fig.24, p.25
Gloag, John and Derek Bridgwater. A history of cast iron in architecture. London : G. Allen and Unwin. 1948. 395p., ill.
Continental Ironwork of the Renaissance and later , J.Starkie Gardner, London, rev. edn. 1930, chapter 2
Decorative Ironwork, Marian Campbell, London 1997, pp. 72-79, and pl. 119

Labels and date

STOVE PLATE
Cast iron
Germany; c. 1605

With the New Testament story of the Marriage Feast at Cana in Galilee (John, chapter 2) at which Christ turned water into wine. The model for this plate was made by Master Ronnung who had a worshop in the Harz region of Germany, c. 1600. Another example of this pattern exists on a stove in Schmalkalden, Germany, dated 1605.

Museum No. 319-1897 [07/1994]

Production Note

This subject was popular on German stove plates

Materials

Cast iron

Techniques

Casting

Categories

Marriage; Eating; Architectural fittings; Metalwork; Ironwork

Collection

Metalwork Collection

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