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The Virgin and Child

Relief
1460-1480 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

The relief is based on an original in gilded marbleof the Virgin and Child with Angels now attributed to Matteo Civitali, an important sculptor from Lucca, and dated to around 1460-61. The marble has been in the church of San Vincenzo Ferrer and Santa Caterina de' Ricci in Prato since the beginning of the 20th century.

A number of close variants cast in stucco and terracotta survive, of which this painted version is one - here reproducing just the Virgin and Child without a background. Reliefs of the Virgin and Child were extremely popular in the late fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. They would have been displayed in the home not just as objects of devotion, but also as exemplars of the ideal mother and child. They could also be found on street corners as neighbourhood protectors, as well as in religious settings. This one was bought in Florence in 1911 from the dealer and collector, Stefano Bardini, whose house is now a magnificent museum.



object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Relief in painted stucco
Brief Description
Relief, painted stucco, the Virgin and Child, after Matteo Civitali, Italy (Florence), c.1460-80.
Physical Description
The Virgin is shown to the knees turning slightly to her left with both arms around the child who rests on a red tasselled cushion on her lap. She is seated in a chair one arm of which terminated in a rosette, is seen at her right side. She wears a red robe and a blue cloak fastened on the breast by a brooch. The child wears a broad striped girdle on a long coral necklace.
Dimensions
  • Height: 85.1cm
  • Width: 55.9cm
Object history
Purchased in Florence from Stefano Bardini.
Subject depicted
Summary
The relief is based on an original in gilded marbleof the Virgin and Child with Angels now attributed to Matteo Civitali, an important sculptor from Lucca, and dated to around 1460-61. The marble has been in the church of San Vincenzo Ferrer and Santa Caterina de' Ricci in Prato since the beginning of the 20th century.



A number of close variants cast in stucco and terracotta survive, of which this painted version is one - here reproducing just the Virgin and Child without a background. Reliefs of the Virgin and Child were extremely popular in the late fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. They would have been displayed in the home not just as objects of devotion, but also as exemplars of the ideal mother and child. They could also be found on street corners as neighbourhood protectors, as well as in religious settings. This one was bought in Florence in 1911 from the dealer and collector, Stefano Bardini, whose house is now a magnificent museum.



Bibliographic References
  • Maclagan, Eric and Longhurst, Margaret H. Catalogue of Italian Sculpture. Text. London: Victoria and Albert Museum, 1932, p. 46
  • Pope-Hennessy, John, assisted by Ronald Lightbown. Catalogue of Italian Sculpture in the Victoria and Albert Museum. Volume I: Text. Eighth to Fifteenth Century. London: Her Majesty's Stationery Office, 1964, cat. no. 112, pp. 134-135
  • Pope-Hennessy, John. 'The Altman Madonna by Antonio Rossellino'. In: Metropolitan Museum Journal. Vol 3, 1970, p. 147, fig 16, n. 16
  • Matteo Civitali e il suo tempo. Pittori, scultori e orafi a Lucca nel tardo Quattrocento. Exh. Cat. Lucca, Museo Nazionale di Villa Guinigi, 3 April – 11 July 2004. Milan: Silvana Editoriale, 2004, cat. no. 2.2, p. 302; see also pp. 296-307.
Other Number
Collection
Accession Number
A.14-1911

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record createdJune 24, 2009
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