Textile

1960-1967 (made)
Textile thumbnail 1
Not currently on display at the V&A

Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

This is an example of adire, an indigo resist dyed cloth made by the Yoruba people of south-western Nigeria. Resist-dyeing involves treating certain areas of the cloth with a ‘resist’ to prevent them absorbing the dye. When starch is used as the resist these cloths are known as adire eleko. The base cloth has a pattern of green and white stripes which can be clearly seen in the areas where the starch has been applied.

This pattern is known as Olokun, ‘goddess of the sea’. The goddess is also associated with wealth. The cloth is divided into four rows of five squares with a series of smaller rectangles around the edge which are then filled in with a variety of patterns.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Indigo-dyed and starch-resist.
Brief Description
Indigo-dyed and starch-resist cloth, Nigeria, 1960-1967
Physical Description
Indigo-dyed with a starch resist over a green and white printed cotton. Two pieces sewn together to make a shape that is roughly square. The cloth is divided into squares which are filled with a variety of patterns, this design is known as 'Olokun'.
Dimensions
  • Length: 63in
  • Width: 76in
Content description
This pattern is named 'Olokun' or sea goddess in Yoruba. The sea goddess is seen as the bringer of wealth.
Summary
This is an example of adire, an indigo resist dyed cloth made by the Yoruba people of south-western Nigeria. Resist-dyeing involves treating certain areas of the cloth with a ‘resist’ to prevent them absorbing the dye. When starch is used as the resist these cloths are known as adire eleko. The base cloth has a pattern of green and white stripes which can be clearly seen in the areas where the starch has been applied.



This pattern is known as Olokun, ‘goddess of the sea’. The goddess is also associated with wealth. The cloth is divided into four rows of five squares with a series of smaller rectangles around the edge which are then filled in with a variety of patterns.

Collection
Accession Number
CIRC.757-1967

About this object record

Explore the Collections contains over a million catalogue records, and over half a million images. It is a working database that includes information compiled over the life of the museum. Some of our records may contain offensive and discriminatory language, or reflect outdated ideas, practice and analysis. We are committed to addressing these issues, and to review and update our records accordingly.

You can write to us to suggest improvements to the record.

Suggest Feedback

record createdJune 24, 2009
Record URL