Bowl

1924-1925 (made)
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Silver, Room 68, The Whiteley Galleries
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

You can see the influence of two decorative styles on this bowl. Its hammered finish, Celtic-inspired motifs and gemstones are features of later examples of metalwork in the Arts and Crafts style. The applied pierced geometric silver band is a step towards the Art Deco style.

The designer, Sibyl Dunlop, presided in caftan and Russian boots over a workshop in Kensington Church Street, London, in the 1920s and 1930s. Her principal craftsman, W. Nathanson, probably made the pierced silver band. He was a master of the piercing saw and firmly believed that some Arts and Crafts metalworkers rejected the saw because they lacked the skill to use it.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Silver decorated with applied silver wire and set with chrysoprases
Brief Description
Silver mounted with chrysoprase, London hallmarks for 1924-5, mark of Sibyl Dunlop.
Physical Description
Silver bowl in the form of a Scottish quaich, the softly planished surface hammered and set with chrysoprases. The bowl rests on a plain circular rim with a wire strip applied to form a simple moulding, similar to the rim of the bowl itself. The body of the bowl, just below the rim, has a band of interlaced applied wire ornament of linked diamond pattern, interspersed at regular intervals with a lozenge framing a diamond cut chrysoprase set in a plain mount. The handles are two 'ears' with concave edges and a straight lip at each end and are attached to the rim diametrically opposite each other. The upper surfaces of the handles are decorated with a Celtic cross design of applied wire, set within a circle with each centre, set with a diamond shaped chrysoprase.



Quaich is probably from the Gaelic word for cup, cuach, and is a two handled, shallow bowl derived from a wooden or sometimes silver banded original. It appears to be a purely Scottish form though it is possible that there is some French influence. It resembles a mazer in as much it too was originally carved out of solid wood.
Dimensions
  • Maximum width: 20.8cm
  • Depth: 15.7cm
  • Height: 6.5cm
Marks and Inscriptions
Hallmarks for London, 1924-5 consisting of the lion passant, the leopard's head, the date letter i for 1924-5 and the mark SD of Sibyl Dunlop. (Hallmark; Struck in the centre of the base on the underside of the bowl.; Struck; 1924-5 Mark of Sibyl Dunlop, London 1924-5. Decorated by W. Nathanson)
Gallery Label
10 BOWL Silver, mounted with chrysoprases London, 1924-5 Mark of Sybil Dunlop Edith Alpers Gift through the American and International Friends of the V&A Sybil Dunlop presided in caftan and Russian boots over a workshop in Kensington Church Street in the 1920s and 1930s. This bowl is an example of late Arts and Crafts metalwork with its hammered finish and Celtic influences, but it also takes a step towards Art Deco with its applied, geometric silver band. The latter is likely to have been the work of W. Nathanson, Sybil Dunlop's principal craftsman, who was a master of the piercing saw and held the firm belief that the reason some Arts and Crafts metalworkers rejected the saw was that they lacked the skill to use it. M.30-1999(18/01/2000)
Credit line
Given by the American Friends of the V&A through the generosity of Edith Alpers
Object history
Edith Alpers Gift through the American and International Friends of the V&A

Sibyl Dunlop presided in caftan and Russian boots over a workshop in Kensington Church Street in the 1920s and 1930s. This bowl is an example of late Arts and Crafts metalwork with its hammered finish and Celtic influences, but it also takes a step towards Art Deco with its applied, geometric silver band. The latter is likely to have been the work of W. Nathanson, Sibyl Dunlop's principal craftsman, who was a master of the piercing saw and held the firm belief that the reason some Arts and Crafts metalworkers rejected the saw was that they lacked the skill to use it.
Summary
You can see the influence of two decorative styles on this bowl. Its hammered finish, Celtic-inspired motifs and gemstones are features of later examples of metalwork in the Arts and Crafts style. The applied pierced geometric silver band is a step towards the Art Deco style.



The designer, Sibyl Dunlop, presided in caftan and Russian boots over a workshop in Kensington Church Street, London, in the 1920s and 1930s. Her principal craftsman, W. Nathanson, probably made the pierced silver band. He was a master of the piercing saw and firmly believed that some Arts and Crafts metalworkers rejected the saw because they lacked the skill to use it.
Bibliographic Reference
Harrod, Tanya The Crafts in Britain in the 20th Century New Haven, London. The Bard Graduate Centre for Studies in the Decorative Arts, Yale University Press, 1999. pp 77-8 ISBN 0300077807
Collection
Accession Number
M.30-1999

About this object record

Explore the Collections contains over a million catalogue records, and over half a million images. It is a working database that includes information compiled over the life of the museum. Some of our records may contain offensive and discriminatory language, or reflect outdated ideas, practice and analysis. We are committed to addressing these issues, and to review and update our records accordingly.

You can write to us to suggest improvements to the record.

Suggest Feedback

record createdFebruary 22, 2000
Record URL