Goblet thumbnail 1
Goblet thumbnail 2
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Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
British Galleries, Room 56, The Djanogly Gallery

Goblet

1684-1700 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Object Type
Large ceremonial goblets survive in comparatively large numbers. Never mentioned in contemporary literature or included in glass bills, they appear to have been made as 'one-offs'. The proportions of this glass suggest that originally it had an elaborate cover, as do some other examples.

Time
The known custom of passing around a single large goblet of wine at the dining table might explain the existence of these example. No doubt there were lingering memories of the importance placed upon the host's silver-gilt cup in medieval times.

Materials & Making
Before the invention of lead glass in the 1670s, it would have been difficult to produce a goblet of this size that could survive being passed around a rowdy dining table. This piece displays all the decorative features that were possible with slow-cooling lead glass: mould-blown ribs pincered together, trailed glass threads pinched into a chain, and applied prunts (glass blobs). An innovation of the 1680s was the inclusion of coins in the hollow knops (swellings) of goblets, a practice which, applied to mugs and jugs, continued until the 1860s. The dates of these coins rarely seems to have any significance, although it is worth noting that the silver threepenny bit in the stem of this goblet was minted in 1685, the last year of Charles II's reign.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Lead glass, with mould-blown, trailed and pincered decoration
Brief Description
Goblet, England (probably London), , 1680-1690, C.139-1925 .
Physical Description
Foot: folded; Knop: ball & prunts; Bowl: round funnel
Dimensions
  • Height: 24.1cm
  • Diameter: 13.9cm
Dimensions checked: Measured; 11/01/1999 by sp/nh
Style
Marks and Inscriptions
The stem contains a Charles II threepenny piece of 1684
Gallery Label
  • stem contains a 3d piece of 1684
  • British Galleries: LEAD-GLASS DRINKING VESSELS
    By the 1680s lead glass was common and cheap enough to provide souvenir toys, such as the tiny glass celebrating the Frost Fair on the River Thames in London. At the same time it was grand enough for the giant ceremonial goblets that were passed around a company of drinkers. The jelly and sweetmeat glasses, dwarf ale glasses and globular mugs for strong ale were typical of the wider range of table glass that was produced from the late 17th century. 'State Glasses & Covers' were listed in the Hampton Court inventory as late as 1736. Such grand goblets were sometimes used as chalices for communion.(27/03/2003)
Credit line
Given by C. Rees-Price, Esq. and Mrs Jeanie H. R. Price.
Object history
Made in London
Summary
Object Type
Large ceremonial goblets survive in comparatively large numbers. Never mentioned in contemporary literature or included in glass bills, they appear to have been made as 'one-offs'. The proportions of this glass suggest that originally it had an elaborate cover, as do some other examples.

Time
The known custom of passing around a single large goblet of wine at the dining table might explain the existence of these example. No doubt there were lingering memories of the importance placed upon the host's silver-gilt cup in medieval times.

Materials & Making
Before the invention of lead glass in the 1670s, it would have been difficult to produce a goblet of this size that could survive being passed around a rowdy dining table. This piece displays all the decorative features that were possible with slow-cooling lead glass: mould-blown ribs pincered together, trailed glass threads pinched into a chain, and applied prunts (glass blobs). An innovation of the 1680s was the inclusion of coins in the hollow knops (swellings) of goblets, a practice which, applied to mugs and jugs, continued until the 1860s. The dates of these coins rarely seems to have any significance, although it is worth noting that the silver threepenny bit in the stem of this goblet was minted in 1685, the last year of Charles II's reign.
Bibliographic Reference
R J Charleston, English Glass, (1984), pl.27a.
Collection
Accession Number
C.139-1925

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record createdDecember 13, 1997
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