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Tenor oboe
  • Tenor oboe
    Stanesby, Thomas jr, born 1692 - died 1754
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Tenor oboe

  • Place of origin:

    London (Made)

  • Date:

    about 1710 to 1750 (Made)

  • Artist/Maker:

    Stanesby, Thomas jr, born 1692 - died 1754 (Maker)

  • Materials and Techniques:

    turned wood resembling cedar, brass ferrule and crook, two brass keys.

  • Museum number:

    291-1882

  • Gallery location:

    On display at the Horniman Museum, London , case A

Tenor oboes are pitched 4 or 5 notes below the treble (or standard) oboe, and were first used in the early 1690s. They were mostly played in royal processions and military marches during the 18th century. The crook-like mouthpiece makes this long instrument less unwieldy to play. This example is the only known surviving tenor oboe made by Thomas Stanesby junior (1692-1754) of London. The Stanesby family made some of the finest wind-instruments in Engliand between about 1690 and 1760.

On loan to Horniman Museum.

Physical description

"Of wood resembling cedar, in two joints, with a brass ferrule at the top end into which an angled brass crook is now soldered. Two round brass keys. The finger-holes of the upper joint are very much narrower than those of the lower joint, and many of the holes are bored at a slant upwards or downwards along the axis of the instrument". - Anthony Baines,Catalogue of Musical Instruments in the Victoria and Albert Museum - Part II: Non-keyboard instruments(London, 1998), p. 97.

Place of Origin

London (Made)

Date

about 1710 to 1750 (Made)

Artist/maker

Stanesby, Thomas jr, born 1692 - died 1754 (Maker)

Materials and Techniques

turned wood resembling cedar, brass ferrule and crook, two brass keys.

Marks and inscriptions

Stanesby Junior
Stamped on both joints

London
Stamped on the lower joint

Dimensions

Length: 76.5 cm including brass crook

Object history note

This instrument was purchased by the Museum for £1 in 1882. It had been part of the collections of Carl Engel (1818-1882), an eminent musicologist from Hanover, who published the Descriptive Catalogue of the Musical Instruments in the South Kensington Museum in 1874. The South Kensington Museum has been known as the Victoria & Albert Museum since 1899.

Descriptive line

Tenor oboe, by Thomas Stanesby , junior, English, about 1710 - 1750.

Bibliographic References (Citation, Note/Abstract, NAL no)

Anthony Baines: Catalogue of Musical Instruments in the Victoria and Albert Museum - Part II: Non-keyboard instruments. (London, 1998), p. 97.

Materials

Wood; Brass

Techniques

Turning

Categories

Musical instruments

Collection

Furniture and Woodwork Collection

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