Panel

1800-1900 (made)
Panel thumbnail 1
Panel thumbnail 2
+1
images
Not currently on display at the V&A

Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

This length of fabric probably formed part of a bedding cover (futonji). It is patterned using a method called kasuri, in which sections of yarn are selectively dyed prior to weaving. A geometric design of a well alternates with a pictorial one of shrimp and bundles of dried abolone strips, or noshi. These latter motifs are auspicious ones, bestowing good fortune on those who slept under the cover. The curve of the shell-fish resembles the hunched back of an elderly person and thus symbolises long-life. The noshi motif derives from a play on words; a homophone of noshi means 'extend' and thus dried abalone strips symbolise extended good fortune, in this case a wish for a prolonged life.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Resist-dyed and woven cotton
Brief Description
Panel of resist-dyed cotton, Hirose, Shimane Prefecture, Japan, 1800-1900
Physical Description
Egasuri ('picture kasuri') panel of bast fibre with a design of noshi, shrimp and a well reserved in white on indigo.
Dimensions
  • Width: 33.0cm
  • Length: 147.3cm
  • Length: 58in
  • Width: 13in
Production
Hirose, Shimane Prefecture, Japan
Subjects depicted
Summary
This length of fabric probably formed part of a bedding cover (futonji). It is patterned using a method called kasuri, in which sections of yarn are selectively dyed prior to weaving. A geometric design of a well alternates with a pictorial one of shrimp and bundles of dried abolone strips, or noshi. These latter motifs are auspicious ones, bestowing good fortune on those who slept under the cover. The curve of the shell-fish resembles the hunched back of an elderly person and thus symbolises long-life. The noshi motif derives from a play on words; a homophone of noshi means 'extend' and thus dried abalone strips symbolise extended good fortune, in this case a wish for a prolonged life.
Collection
Accession Number
T.102-1957

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record createdFebruary 12, 2000
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