Or are you looking for Search the Archives?

Please complete the form to email this item.

Architectural model - Model for Governor' Palace (Raj Bhavan) Chandigarh
  • Model for Governor' Palace (Raj Bhavan) Chandigarh
    Jackson, Andrew
  • Enlarge image

Model for Governor' Palace (Raj Bhavan) Chandigarh

  • Object:

    Architectural model

  • Place of origin:

    London (made)

  • Date:

    1987 (made)

  • Artist/Maker:

    Jackson, Andrew (designer and maker)
    Bhavan, Sasha (designer and maker)
    Linford, David (designer and maker)
    Das Gupta, Noresh (designer and maker)
    Le Corbusier, born 1887 - died 1965 (designer)
    Edward Cullinan Architects (designer and maker)

  • Materials and Techniques:

    Wood with perspex dust cover

  • Credit Line:

    Given by Edward Cullinan Architects

  • Museum number:

    E.50-2008

  • Gallery location:

    Architecture, Room 128

This is the architectural model for the Governor's Palace (Raj Bhavan), Chandigarh, India, 1951, designed by Le Corbusier. This model after Le Corbusier's design was made in 1987 by Andrew Jackson, and the landscape was made by Sasha Bhavan, David Linford, and Noresh Des Gupta, all of Edward Cullinan Architects. This model was made for the exhibition 'Le Corbusier: Architect of the Century' held at the Hayward Gallery, London, 5 March to 7 June, 1987. It was a centenary exhibition organised by the Arts Council of Great Britain in collaboration with the Fondation Le Corbusier, Paris. The model is made to the scale of 1:200.

Although never built, Le Corbusier's design for the Governor's Palace (Raj Bhavan) was part of his concept for the Capitol Complex in Chandigarh, India. His masterplan for the Capitol included the High Court of Justice (1956), the Secretariat (1958), the Palace of Assembly (1964), and the Governor's Palace (1952-54). Le Corbusier grouped the buildings in a composition of monumental scale symbolizing confidence in progress and the creation of harmony out of the violence of religious conflict and the partition riots.

Le Corbusier was one of the most original and influential architects of the twentieth century.

Physical description

Model made out of plain wood surmounted by a concave structure on the roof.

Place of Origin

London (made)

Date

1987 (made)

Artist/maker

Jackson, Andrew (designer and maker)
Bhavan, Sasha (designer and maker)
Linford, David (designer and maker)
Das Gupta, Noresh (designer and maker)
Le Corbusier, born 1887 - died 1965 (designer)
Edward Cullinan Architects (designer and maker)

Materials and Techniques

Wood with perspex dust cover

Dimensions

Height: 40 cm with hood, Width: 107 cm with hood, Length: 167 cm with hood, Height: 30 cm approx. without hood

Descriptive line

Model for Governor's Palace (Raj Bhavan) Chandigarh by Le Corbusier, made by Andrew Jackson and Edward Cullinan Architects

Bibliographic References (Citation, Note/Abstract, NAL no)

Raeburn, Michael and Wilson, Victoria. Le Corbusier: Architect of the Century. London: Arts Council of Great Britain, 1987.

Production Note

The model was made by Andrew Jackson and the landscape was made by Sasha Bhavan, David Linford, and Noresh Das Gupta, all of Edward Cullinan Architects. It was made for the 'Le Corbusier: Architect of the Century', Hayward Gallery, London, 5 March-7 June 1987, a centenary exhibition organised by the Arts Council of Great Britain in collaboration with the Fondation Le Corbusier, Paris.

The Governor's Palace (Raj Bhavan) was part of Le Corbusier's design (1952-54) for the Capitol Complex, but has never been built.

Attribution note: Made to the scale of 1:200.

Materials

Wood; Perspex

Techniques

Model-making

Subjects depicted

Model

Categories

Architecture; Designs; Architectural models

Production Type

Model

Collection

Prints, Drawings & Paintings Collection

Large image request

Please confirm you are using these images within the following terms and conditions, by acknowledging each of the following key points:

Please let us know how you intend to use the images you will be downloading.