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Print - Untitled, from the portfolio 'Art Ex Machina'
  • Untitled, from the portfolio 'Art Ex Machina'
    Kawano, Hiroshi
  • Enlarge image

Untitled, from the portfolio 'Art Ex Machina'

  • Object:

    Print

  • Place of origin:

    Japan (probably, made)
    Montreal (Produced in Montral as part of a box set of serigraphs., published)

  • Date:

    1972 (made)

  • Artist/Maker:

    Kawano, Hiroshi (artist)
    Gheerbrant, Gilles, born 1946 (publisher)

  • Materials and Techniques:

    Screenprint from a computer-generated image

  • Credit Line:

    Given by the Computer Arts Society, supported by System Simulation Ltd, London

  • Museum number:

    E.236:14-2008

  • Gallery location:

    On short term loan out for exhibition

Hiroshi Kawano (b.1925, China) graduated from the department of Philosophy at the University of Tokyo in 1951, specialising in Aesthetics. He went on to receive a postgraduate qualification from the same institution in the Philosophy of Science in 1955 and a PhD from Osaka University in 1986. Like many early computer art pioneers, Kawano was highly influenced by the German philosopher Max Bense, who attempted to create a scientific model for understanding successful aesthetics. Kawano explored these theories using the computer.

It is thought that Kawano began writing his own computer programs in the early 1960s. Many of the results of his early computations were then transferred into more traditional media, such as screenprints like this, at which point Kawano could apply colour.

Kawano is said to have published some of the first computer-generated works of art in a journal in Japan in 1964. He went on to exhibit in the Tendencies 4 and 5 movement in Zagreb, Croatia. The archive of his works is now held by the Centre for Art and Media (ZKM) in Karlsruhe, Germany.

This version of the work is from the Art Ex Machina portfolio of six untitled prints by various artists, published in 1972. The artist has also called it Red Tree, a reference to the bold shapes in the centre of the image.

Physical description

Screenprint from a computer-generated image, mounted on board and laminated.

Place of Origin

Japan (probably, made)
Montreal (Produced in Montral as part of a box set of serigraphs., published)

Date

1972 (made)

Artist/maker

Kawano, Hiroshi (artist)
Gheerbrant, Gilles, born 1946 (publisher)

Materials and Techniques

Screenprint from a computer-generated image

Marks and inscriptions

'193 / 200'
Edition number in blue ink in lower left side.

'Hiroshi Kawano'
Artist's signature in blue ink in lower right side.

Dimensions

Height: 28 cm, Length: 21.8 cm

Descriptive line

Screenprint, by Hiroshi Kawano, 1972, from the portfolio 'Art Ex Machina', six computer-generated screenprints by Barbadillo, Kawano, Knowlton, Mohr, Nake, Nees, with a statement by each artist and a text by Abraham A. Moles, edition 193/200, published by Gilles Gheerbrant, Montréal, 1972.

Labels and date

Chance and Control: Art in the Age of Computers (2018)

HIROSHI KAWANO (1925–2012)
Untitled (Red Tree)
Published by Gilles Gheerbrant (born 1946),
Canada, 1972

Hiroshi Kawano was one of the earliest pioneers of computer-generated art in Japan. Like Georg Nees, he was influenced by Max Bense’s theory that computers had the power to dispel the mystery of art. Kawano believed that the artistic process could be taught to a computer and programmed, creating an autonomous machine that could make its own artistic judgements.

From the portfolio Art Ex Machina
Screenprint, after a computer-generated image made in Japan
Given by the Computer Arts Society, supported by System Simulation Ltd., London
Museum no. E.236:14-2008 [07/07/2018-18/11/2018]

Materials

Paper (fiber product); Mounting board

Techniques

Screenprinting; Computer-generated

Categories

Computer Art; Prints

Collection

Prints, Drawings & Paintings Collection

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