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Armchair - Model 464

Model 464

  • Object:

    Armchair

  • Place of origin:

    London (made)

  • Date:

    11/1930 (made)

  • Artist/Maker:

    W. Lusty & Sons (manufacturer)

  • Materials and Techniques:

    Lloyd Loom woven fibre over steam-bent beech frame

  • Museum number:

    W.6-1992

  • Gallery location:

    In Storage

In 1921 Lusty, a packing case manufacturer, acquired the rights to mass-produce furniture using the American method of weaving twisted paper fibre, patented under the name Lloyd Loom. The product, which could be woven in a variety of patterns, was attached over bentwood frames and often imitated popular furniture forms made in other materials.

Lloyd Loom furniture replaced wicker furniture, which was more expensive and less durable. It was produced in vast quantities from the 1930s to the 1960s. Production-line methods reduced costs but allowed little creative input for individual craftsmen. This chair is given a Moderne feel by the step pattern and the black and gold colouring.

Physical description

Armchair with solid back and arms, in black Lloyd Loom fibre with gold toning, a 'step' pattern decorates the back. It is finished in Jacobean stain and the gold detail was applied by hand.

Place of Origin

London (made)

Date

11/1930 (made)

Artist/maker

W. Lusty & Sons (manufacturer)

Materials and Techniques

Lloyd Loom woven fibre over steam-bent beech frame

Marks and inscriptions

167,861 113,608 117,302 219,838
On the underside of the seat's leading edge - Lusty label bearing the patent numbers

Nov 30
Date stamp - on underside of seat. Quality control and time and motion stamps can also be seen in this area.

Dimensions

Height: 845 mm, Width: 28 in, Height: 16 in seat, Width: 17 in seat, Depth: 17 in seat, Width: 700 mm, Depth: 620 mm

Historical context note

In 1921 Lusty, a packing case manufacturer, acquired the rights to mass-produce furniture using the American method of weaving twisted paper fibre patented under the name Lloyd Loom. The product, which could be woven in a variety of patterns, was attached over bentwood frames and often imitated popular furniture forms made in other materials.

Replacing wicker furniture which was more expensive and less durable, Lloyd Loom furniture was produced in vast quantities from the 1930s and the 1960s. Production-line methods reduced costs but allowed little creative input for individual craftsmen. This chair is given a Moderne feel by the step pattern in the black and gold toning.

[Gareth Williams, 'British Design at Home', p.110]

Descriptive line

Armchair, manufactured by W. Lusty and Sons, London, date stamped November 1930

Bibliographic References (Citation, Note/Abstract, NAL no)

Lloyd Loom Furniture, Lee J. Curtis, Salamander Books, London, 1991

Labels and date

ARMCHAIR, Model 464
Made by W. Lusty and Sons, London
Lloyd Loom woven fibre over steam-bent beech frame
Date-stamped November 1930

The American Lloyd Loom company invented the technique of weaving a lightweight, durable twisted paper material and licensed it to the East End furniture company. The furniture was mass-produced in vast quantities from the 1920s to the 1960s. This model has a Jacquard weave in bronze stain, with a hand-painted gold detail on the back. In 1930 this chair would have cost 48s 6d.

W.6-1992 [1992-2006]
ARMCHAIR
Lloyd Loom woven fibre over steam-bent beech frame
Designer unknown
Made by W. Lusty and Sons, London; Model 464, date-stamped November 1930
W.6-1992

In 1921 Lusty, a packing case manufacturer, acquired the rights to mass-produce furniture using the American method of weaving twisted paper fibre patented under the name Lloyd Loom. The product, which could be woven in a variety of patterns, was attached over bentwood frames and often imitated popular furniture forms made in other materials.

Replacing wicker furniture which was more expensive and less durable, Lloyd Loom furniture was produced in vast quantities form the 1930s to the 1960s. Production-line methods reduced costs but allowed little creative input for individual craftsmen. This chair is given a Moderne feel but the step pattern in the back and the gold toning. [1994]

Materials

Fibre; Beech

Techniques

Woven

Categories

ELISE; Furniture

Collection

Furniture and Woodwork Collection

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