Bowl thumbnail 1
Bowl thumbnail 2
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Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Ceramics, Room 145

Bowl

ca. 1765-1770 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Tin-glazed earthenware was made in England from the sixteenth century and in the following century was decorated in the style of imported pottery from Delft, with the result that it became known as 'delftware'. This piece is one of the largest English delftware punchbowls and bears a finely painted elevation of a ship. Such 'ship bowls' were a speciality of the Liverpool ceramic factories - one of which advertised 'the likeness of vessels taken and painted in the most correct and masterly manner' - and were also made at Bristol. Together with London, these two cities were the main centres for English delftware, being well placed to import clay from Ireland and to export wares to the American colonies. Enamelling, used here for the orange and red, is common on European tin-glazed earthenware but rare on English Delftware and was a further speciality of the Liverpool factories.

Punch came to Europe during the seventeenth century as a result of the East India trade, which also brought Chinese ceramics to the West, and originally contained arrack, a rum-like spirit from Goa and Jakarta, together with lemon juice, water, sugar and spices. Ceramic punchbowls were made in Europe from the 1680s to the 1820s, especially in Britain, and also in China for export to Europe and America. The smallest were for individual use, and many larger ones were made for public houses and communal drinking. The largest bowls, such as this one, often bore commemorative inscriptions or designs and may have been primarily intended as decorative presentation pieces rather than for actual use.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Tin-glazed earthenware painted with enamels
Brief Description
Delftware bowl of enamelled buff coloured tin-glaze earthenware painted with enamels, possibly painted by William Jackson, Liverpool, ca. 1765-1770.
Physical Description
Bowl of enamelled buff coloured tin-glaze earthenware with the interior has a fully-rigged frigate of the Royal Navy, flying a commissioning pennant. The figurehead is in the form of a classical warrior. A carved female figure appears to the right of the windows of the cabin at the stern. The sea is painted in green and the flags and parts of the ship and masts in a strong ochre. All the rest of the decoration inside and outside is in blue. The exterior has five martial trophies including flags, weapons, and musical instruments. Between these are scattered powder horns, cannon balls, barrels, fused balls, chain shot, bar shot and multiple bar shot. The rim has sprays of flowers and foliage.
Dimensions
  • Height: 22.4cm
  • Diameter: 52.2cm
Gallery Label
Bowl Possibly painted by William Jackson, Liverpool, England, about 1765-70 Tin-glazed earthenware 3615-1901 Jermyn Street Collection The bowl depicts a fully-rigged frigate of the Royal Navy.(23/05/2008)
Credit line
Transferred from the Museum of Practical Geology, Jermyn Street
Object history
Purchased from M. Wareham by the Museum of Practical Geology before 1871, probably in 1863. Transferred, 1901. Jermyn Street Collection.
Subjects depicted
Summary
Tin-glazed earthenware was made in England from the sixteenth century and in the following century was decorated in the style of imported pottery from Delft, with the result that it became known as 'delftware'. This piece is one of the largest English delftware punchbowls and bears a finely painted elevation of a ship. Such 'ship bowls' were a speciality of the Liverpool ceramic factories - one of which advertised 'the likeness of vessels taken and painted in the most correct and masterly manner' - and were also made at Bristol. Together with London, these two cities were the main centres for English delftware, being well placed to import clay from Ireland and to export wares to the American colonies. Enamelling, used here for the orange and red, is common on European tin-glazed earthenware but rare on English Delftware and was a further speciality of the Liverpool factories.



Punch came to Europe during the seventeenth century as a result of the East India trade, which also brought Chinese ceramics to the West, and originally contained arrack, a rum-like spirit from Goa and Jakarta, together with lemon juice, water, sugar and spices. Ceramic punchbowls were made in Europe from the 1680s to the 1820s, especially in Britain, and also in China for export to Europe and America. The smallest were for individual use, and many larger ones were made for public houses and communal drinking. The largest bowls, such as this one, often bore commemorative inscriptions or designs and may have been primarily intended as decorative presentation pieces rather than for actual use.
Bibliographic References
  • Archer, Michael. Delftware: the tin-glazed earthenware of the British Isles. A catalogue of the collection in the Victoria and Albert Museum. London: HMSO, in association with the Victoria and Albert Museum, 1997. ISBN 0 11 290499 8
  • M.P.G. 1871 and 1876. Church, p. 91, Fig: 56. Rackham and Read, p. 61. Honey, p. 49.
Other Number
F43. - <u>Delftware</u> (1997) cat. no.
Collection
Accession Number
3615-1901

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record createdJanuary 29, 2000
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