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Photograph - Portrait of Two Unknown Men and Two Dogs
  • Portrait of Two Unknown Men and Two Dogs
    Unknown Edwards & Simonton
  • Enlarge image

Portrait of Two Unknown Men and Two Dogs

  • Object:

    Photograph

  • Place of origin:

    dublin (made)

  • Date:

    1860s (made)

  • Artist/Maker:

    Unknown
    Edwards & Simonton (photographers)

  • Materials and Techniques:

    albumen print

  • Museum number:

    E.495-1995

  • Gallery location:

    Photography Centre, Room 100, The Bern and Ronny Schwartz Gallery, case CA2

The carte de visite was patented in 1854 by the French photographer André-Adolphe-Eugène Disdéri, and soon became the most common type of photograph. Between four and six miniature portraits could be taken on one glass plate negative. Sitters then chose their favourites, which were printed, cut out and mounted onto calling cards. It was fashionable to exchange and collect images of family, friends, royalty and celebrities, into specially designed albums.

Physical description

Portrait of two men and two dogs. Both dogs sit atop a podium-like structure, with the men flanking them on either side. Both men wear dark colours and sport beards.

Place of Origin

dublin (made)

Date

1860s (made)

Artist/maker

Unknown
Edwards & Simonton (photographers)

Materials and Techniques

albumen print

Marks and inscriptions

Edwards & Simonton Photo, 28 Grafton Street Dublin, "The Grafton" Photographic Art Studio

Dimensions

Width: 64 mm, Height: 105 mm

Descriptive line

Photograph by Edwards & Simonton of Dublin, 'Portrait of Two Unknown Men and Two Dogs', ca. 1860s, albumen print

Labels and date

Photography Centre 2018-20:

William Carrick; Ashford Brothers & Co.; Cornelius Jabez Hughes; J.J. Rugg; R. Green; A.W. Turner; J.J. Mayall; Edwards & Simonton; Gregory & Eddy; T. Heaviside; R. James; J. Porter; Ross & Pringle; Southwell Brothers; Enrico Van Lint; Camille Silvy; Elliott & Fry; J. Chaufly; Hills & Saunders; Arthur Debenham; unknown photographers
Cartes de visite
1850s–70s

The carte de visite was patented in 1854 by the French photographer André-Adolphe-Eugène Disdéri, and soon became the most common type of photograph. Between four and six miniature portraits could be taken on one glass plate negative. Sitters then chose their favourites, which were printed, cut out and mounted onto calling cards. It was fashionable to exchange and collect images of family, friends, royalty and celebrities, into specially designed albums.

Albumen prints
Museum nos. E.625, 539, 794, 656, 638, 573, 670, 585, 619, 772, 731, 745, 720, 792, 793, 580, 533, 609, 671, 615, 614, 667, 495, 651, 493, 583, 639, 620, 589, 532-1995; 226-1967; E.514, 30-2009
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Materials

Photographic paper

Techniques

Albumen

Subjects depicted

Dogs; Portraits; Cartes de visite

Categories

Portraits

Collection

Prints, Drawings & Paintings Collection

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