Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Request to view at the Prints & Drawings Study Room, level C , Case 3H, Shelf 24

Analog-Grafik P1 (Pendular Oscillogram)

Print
1970 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Herbert Franke made his ‘electronic graphics’ using an analogue computer, a forerunner of the digital computer, and a cathode-ray oscillograph to convert the electronic signals into images. His fellow student, Dr. Franz Raimann, built Franke a simple analogue device that could calculate multiple plane curves. Franke used a cathode-ray oscillograph as his output device. This apparatus had a screen diameter of 5cm and produced blurred lines. To enhance his images Franke darkened the room and moved a camera to and fro to capture the photographic images. In doing so he was able to fan out the line figures. Between 1955 and 1956 he titled his works made using this technique ‘pendular oscillograms’.

The photograph was used as a basis for a transfer to a silkscreen print which was exhibited at the 1970 Venice biennale.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Silkscreen print mounted on board
Brief Description
Black and white silkscreen print from a photograph of an 'Analog-Grafik P1' (Pendular Oscillogram), 1970 (original photograph 1955), by Herbert W. Franke.
Physical Description
Black and white silkscreen print, mounted on board, from a photograph of an electronic oscillation taken from the screen of a cathode ray tube.
Dimensions
  • Height: 70cm
  • Width: 49.9cm
Credit line
Given by the Computer Arts Society, supported by System Simulation Ltd, London
Object history
Historical significance: This print is after a photograph from a series entitled 'Pendular Oscillograms'. Dating from the mid 1950s, the series demonstrated a pioneering use of machinery in the creation of graphics. The images were achieved by moving the camera across the display screen whilst taking the photograph.
Summary
Herbert Franke made his ‘electronic graphics’ using an analogue computer, a forerunner of the digital computer, and a cathode-ray oscillograph to convert the electronic signals into images. His fellow student, Dr. Franz Raimann, built Franke a simple analogue device that could calculate multiple plane curves. Franke used a cathode-ray oscillograph as his output device. This apparatus had a screen diameter of 5cm and produced blurred lines. To enhance his images Franke darkened the room and moved a camera to and fro to capture the photographic images. In doing so he was able to fan out the line figures. Between 1955 and 1956 he titled his works made using this technique ‘pendular oscillograms’.



The photograph was used as a basis for a transfer to a silkscreen print which was exhibited at the 1970 Venice biennale.

Bibliographic Reference
Herzogenrath, Wulf and Nierhoff-Wielk, Barbara, eds. Ex-Machina - Frühe Computergrafik bis 1979. Munich: Deutscher Kunstverlag, 2007. ISBN 978-3-422-06689-2. p.339 (cat. 69), ill.
Other Number
CAS/A/0038 - Previous owner's number
Collection
Accession Number
E.122-2008

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record createdFebruary 18, 2009
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