Vase

1700-10 (made)
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Ceramics, Room 145
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

This miniature vase was produced at the kilns of Jingdezhen, in south-east China, during the early 18th century, when the fashion for Chinese porcelain was at its highest in Europe. Jingdezhen was at the time the most important ceramic centre in China, supplying both the domestic and export markets.

Miniature vases, produced in a great variety of shapes in China, were privately purchased by European merchants and became particularly popular between the end of the 17th century and the first half of the 18th century, when they were used as decorative items on wall brackets, in cabinets or around mirrors in the residences of aristocrats and wealthy people. One of the largest collection of Chinese porcelain known in Europe belonged to August the Strong of Saxony (d. 1733), who owned more than 21,000 pieces.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Porcelain painted in underglaze blue
Brief Description
Porcelain miniature vase, painted in underglaze blue with flowering plant, Jingdezhen, China, Qing dynasty, Kangxi period (1662-1722)
Physical Description
Porcelain vase of double gourd-shaped, painted in underglaze blue with flowering plant growing among rocks, and a band of triangle-work round the shoulder.
Dimensions
  • Height: 8.6cm
  • Diameter: 4.1cm
Styles
Gallery Label
Miniature double-gourd vase China, Jingdezhen, 1700–10 Museum no. C.15A-1909. Bequeathed by Mrs Cameron(September 2009)
Credit line
Bequeathed by Mrs A. Cameron
Subjects depicted
Summary
This miniature vase was produced at the kilns of Jingdezhen, in south-east China, during the early 18th century, when the fashion for Chinese porcelain was at its highest in Europe. Jingdezhen was at the time the most important ceramic centre in China, supplying both the domestic and export markets.



Miniature vases, produced in a great variety of shapes in China, were privately purchased by European merchants and became particularly popular between the end of the 17th century and the first half of the 18th century, when they were used as decorative items on wall brackets, in cabinets or around mirrors in the residences of aristocrats and wealthy people. One of the largest collection of Chinese porcelain known in Europe belonged to August the Strong of Saxony (d. 1733), who owned more than 21,000 pieces.
Collection
Accession Number
C.15A-1909

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record createdDecember 12, 2008
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