Vase

1700-10 (made)
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Ceramics, Room 145
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Porcelain objects with a dark blue glaze and decoration in coral-red enamel and gold were amongst the most popular items produced at the Jingdezhen kilns in south-east China for export. This type of glaze was called chuiqing or 'blown blue' in China, and known as bleu soufflé or fouetté in Europe. The name derives from the particular technique required to apply the glaze on the surface: the powdered cobalt was blown through a bamboo cane that had a fine gauze at one of the extremities.

Objects with powder-blue glaze were produced since the late 17th century, and by the early 18th century fine gilded decorations of flowers, landscapes and symbolic motifs were added on the surface. They were particularly favoured in the Middle East but also widely exported in Europe, where they were used as tableware in the residences of aristocrats and wealthy people, or exhibited on the walls and in the niches of the so-called 'porcelain rooms'.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Porcelain with powder-blue glaze and painted in red enamel and gold
Brief Description
Porcelain rouleau vase with powder-blue glaze and decorated in iron red and gold, Jingdezhen, China, Qing dynasty, Kangxi period (1662-1722)
Physical Description
Porcelain rouleau vase, elongated and almost cylindrical body, with straight neck and projecting rim, decorated with powder-blue glaze and painted in red enamel and gold. On the body, four carps reserved in white, with details painted in overglaze red enamel; on the neck swastika and shou symbols enclosed by bands of chevron and pearl pattern.
Dimensions
  • Height: 47.3cm
  • Diameter: 18.4cm
Styles
Gallery Label
Cylindrical vase with enamelled and gilded carp China, Jingdezhen, 1700–10 Museum nos. 199-1905, given by W.G. Gulland(September 2009)
Credit line
Given by W.G. Gulland, Esq.
Subjects depicted
Summary
Porcelain objects with a dark blue glaze and decoration in coral-red enamel and gold were amongst the most popular items produced at the Jingdezhen kilns in south-east China for export. This type of glaze was called chuiqing or 'blown blue' in China, and known as bleu soufflé or fouetté in Europe. The name derives from the particular technique required to apply the glaze on the surface: the powdered cobalt was blown through a bamboo cane that had a fine gauze at one of the extremities.



Objects with powder-blue glaze were produced since the late 17th century, and by the early 18th century fine gilded decorations of flowers, landscapes and symbolic motifs were added on the surface. They were particularly favoured in the Middle East but also widely exported in Europe, where they were used as tableware in the residences of aristocrats and wealthy people, or exhibited on the walls and in the niches of the so-called 'porcelain rooms'.
Collection
Accession Number
199-1905

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record createdDecember 11, 2008
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