Shah Shuja', Aurangzeb and Murad Bakhsh thumbnail 1
Shah Shuja', Aurangzeb and Murad Bakhsh thumbnail 2
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Shah Shuja', Aurangzeb and Murad Bakhsh

Painting
ca. 1635 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

This painting depicts three sons of the Mughal emperor Shah Jahan (r. 1628-1658). They are identified in the Persian inscription in the border beneath, which states that these are the likenesses of Shah Shuja' Bahadur, Aurangzeb Bahadur and Murad Bakhsh, and that it is the work of the artist Balchand. The artist's own faint signature is discernible on the white tree trunk behind the princes. The painting has the floral borders characteristic of the albums of Shah Jahan which contained folios with paintings on one side and specimens of fine calligraphy on the other. An 18th century copy of the painting is in the Bodleian Library, Oxford (Ms.Douce.Or.a.1 folio 24b).
The folio is from a group of paintings acquired at auction in 1925 where they were sold as "The Minto Album" and subsequently divided between the Chester Beatty Library, Dublin and the V&A.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Painted in opaque watercolour and gold on paper
Brief Description
Painting depicting three sons of Shah Jahan on horseback, by Balchand, opaque watercolour and gold on paper, Mughal, ca. 1635
Physical Description
Painting, in opaque watercolour and gold on paper, depicting the three younger sons of Shah Jahan, Shah' Shuja, Aurangzeb and Murad Bakhsh; they are shown riding horses in a landscape and are identified in the inscription in black ink beneath them, on the narrow frame. The painting is mounted on a page with flowering plants in opaque water colour and gold filling the borders at top, bottom and sides.
Dimensions
  • Painting height: 23.8cm
  • Painting width: 16.9cm
  • Page height: 38.8cm
  • Page width: 26.5cm
Content description
The three younger sons of Shah Jahan, Shah' Shuja, Aurangzeb and Murad Bakhsh; they are shown riding horses in a landscape.
Style
Marks and Inscriptions
  • (Probably in the hand of Shah Jahan)
  • amal-e balchand bandeh-ye dargah (very faintly discernible on the lower part of the white tree trunk)
Object history
The folio is from a group of paintings acquired at auction in 1925 where they were sold as "The Minto Album" and subsequently divided between the Chester Beatty Library, Dublin and the V&A.
Subjects depicted
Summary
This painting depicts three sons of the Mughal emperor Shah Jahan (r. 1628-1658). They are identified in the Persian inscription in the border beneath, which states that these are the likenesses of Shah Shuja' Bahadur, Aurangzeb Bahadur and Murad Bakhsh, and that it is the work of the artist Balchand. The artist's own faint signature is discernible on the white tree trunk behind the princes. The painting has the floral borders characteristic of the albums of Shah Jahan which contained folios with paintings on one side and specimens of fine calligraphy on the other. An 18th century copy of the painting is in the Bodleian Library, Oxford (Ms.Douce.Or.a.1 folio 24b).

The folio is from a group of paintings acquired at auction in 1925 where they were sold as "The Minto Album" and subsequently divided between the Chester Beatty Library, Dublin and the V&A.
Bibliographic References
  • Ellen Smart, 'Balchand' in Pratapatidya Pal, ed., Master Artists of the Imperial Mughal court, Bombay, Marg Publications, 1991, p. 146, pl. 14. Susan Stronge, Painting for the Mughal Emperor. The art of the book in India 1560-1650, V&A Publications, 2002, pl. 17, p. 155 Ellen Smart, 'The Death of Inayat Khan by the Mughal artist Balchand', in Artibus Asiae, LVIII, 3/4, p. 275
  • Swallow, D., Stronge, S., Crill, R., Koezuka, T., editor and translator, "The Art of the Indian Courts. Miniature Painting and Decorative Arts", Victoria & Albert Museum and NHK Kinki Media Plan, 1993.p. 81, cat. no. 63
  • Irwin, John C., Indian Art, Victoria and Albert Museum, London: H. M. Stationery Office, 1968pl. 39
Collection
Accession Number
IM.13-1925

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record createdDecember 15, 1999
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