In a Shoreham Garden thumbnail 1
In a Shoreham Garden thumbnail 2
+1
images
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Request to view at the Prints & Drawings Study Room, level H , Shelf B, Case 95, Box 55

In a Shoreham Garden

Watercolour
ca.1830 (painted)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Samuel Palmer (1805-1881) taught himself to paint. He greatly admired the work of the artist and poet William Blake (1757-1827). He especially admired Blake’s visionary approach and his lack of respect for conventional watercolour techniques.

This watercolour has a magical, powerful and dreamlike quality. Palmer painted it during his ‘Shoreham Period’. He stayed in Shoreham, a village in the English county of Kent, from 1826 until about 1834.
read What is watercolour? From the moment the South Kensington Museum (now the V&A) opened its doors to the public in 1857, watercolours were at the heart of the new museum's ambitions for its fine art collections. It was the artist Richard Redgrave, the government's Inspector-General for Art, who championed the fo...
object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Watercolour
Brief Description
Watercolour entitled 'In a Shoreham Garden' by Samuel Palmer. England, ca.1830.
Physical Description
An apple tree in blossom in a walled garden and beyond the tree stands a woman in a red robe.
Dimensions
  • Height: 28.2cm
  • Width: 22.3cm
Style
Gallery Label
Samuel Palmer 1805-1881 In a Shoreham Garden About 1829 Palmer's religious faith pervades the early paintings he produced at Shoreham in Kent. This magical work echoes the Garden of Eden. It includes an apple tree in blossom, a lone woman and a snake-like creeper at the lower right. Palmer once wrote, 'spring showers, blossoms and odours in profusion...Breathe on earth the air of Paradise'. Watercolour and gouaces on paper Purchased 1926 Museum no. P.32-1926
Subjects depicted
Places Depicted
Summary
Samuel Palmer (1805-1881) taught himself to paint. He greatly admired the work of the artist and poet William Blake (1757-1827). He especially admired Blake’s visionary approach and his lack of respect for conventional watercolour techniques.



This watercolour has a magical, powerful and dreamlike quality. Palmer painted it during his ‘Shoreham Period’. He stayed in Shoreham, a village in the English county of Kent, from 1826 until about 1834.
Bibliographic References
  • Vaughan, William, Barker, Elizabeth E., Harrison, Colin, et al. Samuel Palmer 1805- 1881 : Vision and Landscape. London : British Museum Press 2005no. 66
  • Victoria and Albert Museum, Department of Engraving, Illustration and Design and Department of Paintings, Accessions 1926, London: Board of Education, 1927.
  • Coombs, Katherine British watercolours : 1750-1950 . London: V&A Publications, 2012p.123, pl.116
Collection
Accession Number
P.32-1926

About this object record

Explore the Collections contains over a million catalogue records, and over half a million images. It is a working database that includes information compiled over the life of the museum. Some of our records may contain offensive and discriminatory language, or reflect outdated ideas, practice and analysis. We are committed to addressing these issues, and to review and update our records accordingly.

You can write to us to suggest improvements to the record.

Suggest Feedback

record createdDecember 15, 1999
Record URL