Computer Structures 1-1a, 2a, 3a, 4 thumbnail 1
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Request to view at the Prints & Drawings Study Room, level F , Case TOPIC, Shelf 8A

Computer Structures 1-1a, 2a, 3a, 4

Prints
1969 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

These six offset lithographs are smaller versions of a series of enamel on Perspex paintings created by Peter Struycken. The original paintings measured 150 x 150 cm and were made in 1969.

Struycken created the paintings from a series of computer-generated images produced using a computer program, or code, written by the artist. The first image in the top left corner, entitled 'PROGRAM' is an example of this code.

Struycken welcomed the ability of the computer to calculate endless visual alternatives for the arrangement of a series of different coloured squares across the picture plane. These 5 images are from a series of 8 paintings, which were chosen as the final selection from a much larger sequence of images, all of which are versions of one another. For Struycken, the computer enabled him to investigate the role of chance in the creative process, whilst also retaining some measure of control.


object details
Category
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Offset lithographs on board
Brief Description
Six offset lithographs mounted on board, 'Computer Structures 1-1a, 2a, 3a, 4', by Peter Struycken, 1969.
Physical Description
Six black and white offset lithographs after computer generated images, mounted on board.
Dimensions
  • Of mount height: 39.6cm
  • Of mount width: 57cm
  • Of each print height: 15.6cm
  • Of each print width: 15.6cm
Marks and Inscriptions
'PROGRAM', 'COMPUTERSTRUCTURE 1', '1A', '2A', '3A', '4'. OSTRC inscribed at the top of the print is the name of the first program used by the artist to make his artworks. The program was written in Algol 60. Peter Struycken was helped in writing the computer program for these drawings by the physicist Constant A.G.M. (Stan) Tempelaars (1938 - 2010) and by Greta Vermeulen. (Headings or titles for each print, placed underneath each image on the left side.)
Credit line
Given by the Computer Arts Society, supported by System Simulation Ltd, London
Production
Attribution note: These offset lithographic prints are taken from the catalogue 'P. Struycken, Komputerstrukturen', published on the occasion of the exhibition of the same name at Verfindustrie Jac.Eyck nv, Heerlen, Holland, in 1969 (see References).



They are smaller versions of large enamel on Perspex paintings, with the exception of the print entitled 'PROGRAM', which is a reproduction of the computer program used to generate these designs.



These offset lithographs were not mounted by the artist, and the orientation is not correct. For the correct orientation, see; Blotkamp, Carel, et al. P. Struycken, Komputerstrukturen. Holland: Verfindustrie Jac. Eyck nv, 1969, (24) pp. with b/w plates. [12761]
Summary
These six offset lithographs are smaller versions of a series of enamel on Perspex paintings created by Peter Struycken. The original paintings measured 150 x 150 cm and were made in 1969.



Struycken created the paintings from a series of computer-generated images produced using a computer program, or code, written by the artist. The first image in the top left corner, entitled 'PROGRAM' is an example of this code.



Struycken welcomed the ability of the computer to calculate endless visual alternatives for the arrangement of a series of different coloured squares across the picture plane. These 5 images are from a series of 8 paintings, which were chosen as the final selection from a much larger sequence of images, all of which are versions of one another. For Struycken, the computer enabled him to investigate the role of chance in the creative process, whilst also retaining some measure of control.
Bibliographic Reference
Blotkamp, Carel, et al. P. Struycken, Komputerstrukturen. Holland: Verfindustrie Jac. Eyck nv, 1969. (24) pp. with b/w plates. [12761].
Other Number
CAS/A/0169 - Previous owner's number
Collection
Accession Number
E.171-2008

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record createdOctober 6, 2008
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