Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
South Asia, Room 41

Architecture

19th century (made)
Artist/Maker
Place of origin

Jalis or screens of pierced stone were a distinctive feature of Indian architecture, especially in the northern parts of the country. The perforated stone, often worked into beautiful patterns, sometimes of complex geometry, permits sunlight to enter a building while also allowing cooling air to circulate. They also enabled the inhabitants to see out while preserving their privacy. This example was made in Agra, Uttar Pradesh, in the 19th century, but was copied from a late 16th century model. It was purchased for the Museum in India in 1880-82 by Caspar Purdon Clarke.


Object details

Categories
Object type
Materials and techniques
Carved sandstone
Brief description
Jali or screen, carved and pierced sandstone, Agra, 19th century.
Physical description
Carved and pierced sandstone.
Dimensions
  • Height: 20.5in
  • Width: 15.5in
Gallery label
SCREENS: Carved and pierced sandstone, Agra, 19th Century.(Nehru Galleru, 2001)
Object history
Purchased for the Museum in India in 1880-82 by Caspar Purdon Clarke.
Summary
Jalis or screens of pierced stone were a distinctive feature of Indian architecture, especially in the northern parts of the country. The perforated stone, often worked into beautiful patterns, sometimes of complex geometry, permits sunlight to enter a building while also allowing cooling air to circulate. They also enabled the inhabitants to see out while preserving their privacy. This example was made in Agra, Uttar Pradesh, in the 19th century, but was copied from a late 16th century model. It was purchased for the Museum in India in 1880-82 by Caspar Purdon Clarke.
Bibliographic reference
Skelton, Robert, et al, The Indian Heritage. Court life and Arts under Mughal Rule London: The Victoria and Albert Museum, 1982 cat. no. 15
Collection
Accession number
IS.1033-1883

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Record createdAugust 28, 2008
Record URL
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