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Not currently on display at the V&A

Long Gown

ca. 1850 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

The embroidery on the skirt of this long gown is unusally flamboyant for such a garment, and may well be Indian in origin. The fabric may have been intended for light furnishing use, such as cradle drapes or a dressing table cover. The flowers are stylized, but the larger blooms suggest some types of china aster, which were extremely popular in the nineteenth century, many new varities being developed and grown.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
White muslin, embroidered finished with a scalloped hem, drawstring and a pearl button
Brief Description
Baby's long gown of white muslin embroidered in white with sprays of flowers; made in England, ca. 1850
Physical Description
For a baby: long gown of white muslin, the skirt embroidered in white with sprays of stylized flowers resembling daisies and china asters worked in chain stitch. The bodice has a rounded neck and short sleeves, and a centre front panel composed of horizontal bands of embroidered insertion; there are robings of scalloped cutwork on the bodice, but they do not continue down the skirt. The skirt is gathered to the waist, and finished with a scalloped hem which is embroidered in an overlapping fishscale pattern with a circular motif in each 'scale'. The garment fastens at the back of the bodice with drawstrings at neck and waist, and a single pearl button.
Dimensions
  • Centre back length: 106cm
  • At hem circumference: 171.5cm
  • Centre back length: 41¾in
  • At hem circumference: 67½in
Credit line
Given by Miss Joan Hassall
Object history
The original catalogue record of 1963 states that it was given to the museum by Miss Joan Hassall, the illustrator (1906-88), and had been given to her mother (née Constance Brooke-Webb) by the Baden-Powell family - Robert Baden-Powell, the founder of the Scouting movement, and Miss Hassall's father, the illustrator John Hassall, were both menbers of the London Sketch Club.
Subject depicted
Summary
The embroidery on the skirt of this long gown is unusally flamboyant for such a garment, and may well be Indian in origin. The fabric may have been intended for light furnishing use, such as cradle drapes or a dressing table cover. The flowers are stylized, but the larger blooms suggest some types of china aster, which were extremely popular in the nineteenth century, many new varities being developed and grown.
Collection
Accession Number
T.227-1963

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record createdJuly 17, 2008
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