Box thumbnail 1
Not currently on display at the V&A

Box

ca. 1850 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Decorative papier mache was a speciality of Kashmir and was made for both the local and European markets. Painted and varnished wood was often used in place of true papier mache from the later 19th century onwards, but the finest work was produced by building up layers of moistened paper in a mould to the required shape, which was then smoothed, painted and varnished.
The box was given by Queen Victoria in 1852, the year in which the Museum's collections began to be acquired.


object details
Category
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Papier mache, painted and varnished
Brief Description
Domed box: papier mache, painted and varnished, Srinagar, Kashmir, ca. 1850
Physical Description
Box, papier mache, painted and varnished. Decagonal with a raised or dome-shaped cover. The decoration consists of horizontally divided bands running around the box, with three bands of stylised flower decoration alternating with two bands of more naturalistically depicted flowers with, in the upper of the two, birds among the foliage.
Dimensions
  • Height: 8in
  • Diameter: 11in
Gallery Label
1. DOMED BOX Papier mache, painted and varnished Srinagar, Kashmir, c.1850 Decorative papier mache was a speciality of Kashmir and made for both the local and European markets. Painted and varnished wood was often used in place of true papier mache from the later 19th century onwards, but the finest work was produced by building up layers of moistened paper in a mould to the required shape, which was then smoothed, painted and varnished. 3-1852 Given by HM Queen Victoria(2001)
Credit line
Given by HM Queen Victoria
Object history
Given by Queen Victoria. Described in the South Kensington Museum Inventory has having come from Lahore and as 'modern' (1852).
Subjects depicted
Summary
Decorative papier mache was a speciality of Kashmir and was made for both the local and European markets. Painted and varnished wood was often used in place of true papier mache from the later 19th century onwards, but the finest work was produced by building up layers of moistened paper in a mould to the required shape, which was then smoothed, painted and varnished.

The box was given by Queen Victoria in 1852, the year in which the Museum's collections began to be acquired.
Collection
Accession Number
3-1852

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record createdJuly 17, 2008
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