Spittoon thumbnail 1
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Ceramics, Room 145

Spittoon

1747 (dated)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

A spittoon is a receptacle for spitting into. Spittoons have been used for centuries in many parts of the world, and their exact shape and function vary according to local habits. They may be used for spitting out the dregs of a drink, or the residue from chewing stimulants such as tobacco (in Europe) or betel nuts (in south-east Asia).


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Tin-glazed earthenware painted with enamels and gilding
Brief Description
Rectangular spittoon with handle, tin-glazed earthenware painted in colours, made Delft, Netherlands, dated 1747
Physical Description
Rectangular spittoon with handle, painted decoration in colours depicting Dutch ships, a man reading a letter and a woman on the rim and fruit-picking scenes on the body.
Dimensions
  • Height: 7.9cm
  • Length: 14.1cm
  • Width: 11.2cm
Marks and Inscriptions
'1747' and 'MVP [sic]' (Painted on the rim)
Gallery Label
Spittoon made Delft, Netherlands dated 1747 Inscriptions: '1747' and 'MVP' (?), painted on the rim, on the letter Tin-glazed earthenware painted with enamels and gilding C.2337-1910 Salting Bequest(16/07/2008)
Credit line
Bequeathed by George Salting, Esq.
Summary
A spittoon is a receptacle for spitting into. Spittoons have been used for centuries in many parts of the world, and their exact shape and function vary according to local habits. They may be used for spitting out the dregs of a drink, or the residue from chewing stimulants such as tobacco (in Europe) or betel nuts (in south-east Asia).
Bibliographic References
  • The Hague. 1999. pp.249. Catalogue entry 91.
  • Fourest, Henri Pierre. Delftware : faience production at Delft. London : Thames and Hudson, 1980. 118 p., fig 114.
  • Lahaussois, C, Delft Faïence, Paris, Brussels 2008, pp. 262-165, fig 3
Collection
Accession Number
C.2337-1910

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record createdJuly 16, 2008
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