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Tent panel

Tent panel

  • Place of origin:

    Deccan (possibly, made)
    Burhanpur (possibly, made)

  • Date:

    late 17th century-early 18th century (made)

  • Artist/Maker:

    Unknown

  • Materials and Techniques:

    Printed, painted and dyed cotton

  • Credit Line:

    Given by G. P. Baker

  • Museum number:

    IS.56-1950

  • Gallery location:

    South Asia, Room 41, case 22

Continuous cloth panels like this could be used as screens around areas of an encampment, especially to surround the ruler's enclosure. These screens were often highly decorative on the inner surface, usually with plain red exteriors. It has been plausibly suggested that this textile is not a screen but a set of prayer mats, and the plain red stripes between each niche might indicate that they were intended to be cut and used separately for that purpose. Cotton prayer mats of similar format are made in South-East India and Iran.

Physical description

Tent panel (qanat) or saf (row of prayer mats) of printed, painted and dyed cotton. With a row of five arched panels, each with floral designs in the spandrels and decorative floral meander borders in shades of red and yellow against an undyed ground, and forming a horizontal screen or row of individual mats.

Place of Origin

Deccan (possibly, made)
Burhanpur (possibly, made)

Date

late 17th century-early 18th century (made)

Artist/maker

Unknown

Materials and Techniques

Printed, painted and dyed cotton

Dimensions

Height: 134.5 cm, Height: 165.5 in, Width: 53 in

Object history note

Given by G.P.Baker.

Descriptive line

Tent panel (qanat) or row of prayer mats with 5 niches of printed, painted and dyed cotton, possibly made in Deccan or Burhanpur, late 17th century or early 18th century. The niches are divided with plain red strips which could be where they are meant to be cut and used separately.

Bibliographic References (Citation, Note/Abstract, NAL no)

'The Indian Heritage: Court Life and Arts under Mughal Rule', V&A, 1982, cat.no.231.

Labels and date

TENT PANELS (QANAT): Cotton, printed, painted and dyed, Deccan, Burhanpur, Late 17th and early 18th century.
Continuous cloth panels like this were used as screens around areas of an encampment, especially to isolate the ruler's enclosure. They were often highly decorative but plain red examples are often seen in paintings. [Nehru Gallery, 2001]

Subjects depicted

Floral patterns

Categories

Textiles; Interiors

Collection

South & South East Asia Collection

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