Running Cola is Africa

Print
1968 (printed)
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Prints & Drawings Study Room, level C
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

This is one of a set of seven lithographs by different artists, published by Motif Editions in connection with Cybernetic Serendipity, a major exhibition held at London's Institute of Contemporary Arts in 1968. The portfolio includes two works by the Computer Technique Group, plus single works by Charles Csuri and James Shaffer, William Fetter, Maughan S. Mason, Donald K. Robbins, and Kerry Strand. The complete set was acquired by the Museum in 1969, at a cost of £5.

The original plotter drawing for Running Cola is Africa was created by members of the Computer Technique Group in late 1967 or early 1968, at the IBM Scientific Data Centre in Tokyo. The book published to coincide with the Cybernetic Serendipity exhibition includes the following information about the artwork:

"A computer algorithm converts a running man into a bottle of cola, which in turn is converted into the map of Africa.
Idea by Masao Komura, data by Makato Ohtake, programme by Koji Fujino (CTG)" (p.75-76)

Early references to the group include the English-language spelling Komura, but the artist himself prefers the spelling Kohmura.

This copy of Running Cola is Africa was donated to the Museum by the Computer Arts Society. Some of the Society's founding members had been involved in the Cybernetic Serendipity exhibition.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Lithograph on paper
Brief Description
Lithograph after a computer-generated drawing, 'Running Cola is Africa', 1967/1968, by the Computer Technique Group.
Physical Description
Lithograph in black ink on white paper, mounted on board. From a computer-generated drawing of a running human figure morphing into a coca-cola bottle and back into a drawing of the African continent.
Dimensions
  • Height: 49.1cm
  • Width: 72.6cm
Marks and Inscriptions
'Running Cola is Africa 1967/1968', by the Computer Technique Group, Japan. Computer Graphic from I.C.A. Exhibition Cybernetic Serendipity. Published by Motif Editions C., 58th Frith Street, London W1.' (Computer text in lower left side.)
Credit line
Given by the Computer Arts Society, supported by System Simulation Ltd, London
Object history
This print featured in the Cybernetic Serendipity Collector's Set. This was a portfolio of prints produced on the occasion of the Cybernetic Serendipity exhibition at the ICA in 1968.
Subjects depicted
Place Depicted
Summary
This is one of a set of seven lithographs by different artists, published by Motif Editions in connection with Cybernetic Serendipity, a major exhibition held at London's Institute of Contemporary Arts in 1968. The portfolio includes two works by the Computer Technique Group, plus single works by Charles Csuri and James Shaffer, William Fetter, Maughan S. Mason, Donald K. Robbins, and Kerry Strand. The complete set was acquired by the Museum in 1969, at a cost of £5.



The original plotter drawing for Running Cola is Africa was created by members of the Computer Technique Group in late 1967 or early 1968, at the IBM Scientific Data Centre in Tokyo. The book published to coincide with the Cybernetic Serendipity exhibition includes the following information about the artwork:



"A computer algorithm converts a running man into a bottle of cola, which in turn is converted into the map of Africa.

Idea by Masao Komura, data by Makato Ohtake, programme by Koji Fujino (CTG)" (p.75-76)



Early references to the group include the English-language spelling Komura, but the artist himself prefers the spelling Kohmura.



This copy of Running Cola is Africa was donated to the Museum by the Computer Arts Society. Some of the Society's founding members had been involved in the Cybernetic Serendipity exhibition.
Other Number
CAS/A/0012 - Previous owner's number
Collection
Accession Number
E.92-2008

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record createdMay 21, 2008
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