Alfonso II d'Este, Duke of Ferrara thumbnail 1
Not currently on display at the V&A

Alfonso II d'Este, Duke of Ferrara

Medal
ca. 1550 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place of origin

This is a lead medal made by Domenico Poggini (1520-1590) in Florence, Italy, about 1550. The obverse of this medal represents Alfonso II d'Este, the Duke of Ferrara, and the reverse shows Lucrezia de' Medici, the Duchess of Ferrara.
It was bought from the Soulages collection.
Jules Soulages (1812-1856) was a collector of French and Italian Renaissance art. After his death his collection was acquired by the Museum. Born in Toulouse in 1803, Jules Soulages practised as a lawyer in Paris and was founding member of the Société Archeologique du Midi de la France. He created an extensive collection of French and Italian Renaissance decorative art from 1825, comprising around 750 objects, including furniture, glass, ceramics, bronzes, enamels and ivories. In the late 1840s Soulages moved back to Toulouse, where Henry Cole viewed his collection in 1855. Subsequent sale negotiations led to the production of a catalogue and two exhibitions in England at the Museum of Ornamental Art at Marlborough House, and at the Manchester Art Treasures exhibition respectively, both enhancing the celebrity of the collection, and resulting in its acquisition for the South Kensington Museum. Soulages died on 13 October 1857, aged 54.



Object details
Categories
Object type
Materials and techniques
Brief description
Medal, lead, Alfonso II d'Este, Duke of Ferrara/Lucrezia de' Medici, by Domenico Poggini, Italian (Florentine), ca. 1550
Dimensions
  • Diameter: 4.76cm
Object history
It was bought from the Soulages collection in 1865. The dealer John Webb was despatched to examine and report on the collection, which was purchased between 1859 and 1865 in installments for £11,000 with the assistance of 73 subscribers.
Summary
This is a lead medal made by Domenico Poggini (1520-1590) in Florence, Italy, about 1550. The obverse of this medal represents Alfonso II d'Este, the Duke of Ferrara, and the reverse shows Lucrezia de' Medici, the Duchess of Ferrara.

It was bought from the Soulages collection.

Jules Soulages (1812-1856) was a collector of French and Italian Renaissance art. After his death his collection was acquired by the Museum. Born in Toulouse in 1803, Jules Soulages practised as a lawyer in Paris and was founding member of the Société Archeologique du Midi de la France. He created an extensive collection of French and Italian Renaissance decorative art from 1825, comprising around 750 objects, including furniture, glass, ceramics, bronzes, enamels and ivories. In the late 1840s Soulages moved back to Toulouse, where Henry Cole viewed his collection in 1855. Subsequent sale negotiations led to the production of a catalogue and two exhibitions in England at the Museum of Ornamental Art at Marlborough House, and at the Manchester Art Treasures exhibition respectively, both enhancing the celebrity of the collection, and resulting in its acquisition for the South Kensington Museum. Soulages died on 13 October 1857, aged 54.



Bibliographic references
  • Inventory of Art Objects acquired in the Year 1865. Inventory of the Objects in the Art Division of the Museum at South Kensington, arranged According to the Dates of their Acquisition. Vol. 1. London : Printed by George E. Eyre and William Spottiswoode for H.M.S.O., 1868, p. 40
  • Robinson, John Charles. Catalogue of the Soulages Collection. London: Chapman & Hall, 1856, p. 149
Collection
Accession number
708-1865

About this object record

Explore the Collections contains over a million catalogue records, and over half a million images. It is a working database that includes information compiled over the life of the museum. Some of our records may contain offensive and discriminatory language, or reflect outdated ideas, practice and analysis. We are committed to addressing these issues, and to review and update our records accordingly.

You can write to us to suggest improvements to the record.

Suggest Feedback

Record createdMay 6, 2008
Record URL
Download as: JSONIIIF Manifest