Not currently on display at the V&A

Alfonso of Aragon, king of Naples and Sicily

Medal
ca. 1455-1458 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

This is a bronze medal made by Cristoforo di Geremia in Rome, Italy, probably in about 1455-1458. The obverse of this medal represents Alfonso V. of Aragon (1396-1458), the King of Naples and Sicily and the reverse shows Alfonso crowned by Mars and Bellona.
Alfonso left Spain for the last time in 1432 and was eventually proclaimed king of Naples in 1442 having fought the Duke of Anjou who was then its ruler. Alfonso studied the classics and owned an important art collection, including numerous coins. His patronage of Pisanello in particular was significant for the development of the medal.

Cristoforo di Geremia (active 1456-76) was a sculptor and medallist of Mantua, whose name appears also as Christophorus Hierimia, Christophorus de Geremiis de Mantua. Filaretus mentions him in 1460 as one of the best contemporary sculptors. In 1461 he went to Rome, and until 1465 remained in the service of the Cardinal of Aquileia, Lodovico Scarampi Mezzarota; after the latter's death he was employed by Pope Paul II. in 1468 he was entrusted with the restoration of the equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius which was then in San Giovanni Laterano. After this date no mention of him occurs in contemporary records, and that leads to the assumption that he must have died in the early years of Sixtus IV's pontificate, whose medal was executed by Lysippus, Christophorus's nephew.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Bronze
Brief Description
Medal, cast bronze, Alfonso of Aragon/Alfonso crowned by Mars and Bellona, by Cristoforo di Geremia, Italy (Rome), ca. 1455-58
Dimensions
  • Diameter: 7.62cm
Object history
Bought from the Soulages Collection in 1865, for £3.
Subjects depicted
Summary
This is a bronze medal made by Cristoforo di Geremia in Rome, Italy, probably in about 1455-1458. The obverse of this medal represents Alfonso V. of Aragon (1396-1458), the King of Naples and Sicily and the reverse shows Alfonso crowned by Mars and Bellona.

Alfonso left Spain for the last time in 1432 and was eventually proclaimed king of Naples in 1442 having fought the Duke of Anjou who was then its ruler. Alfonso studied the classics and owned an important art collection, including numerous coins. His patronage of Pisanello in particular was significant for the development of the medal.



Cristoforo di Geremia (active 1456-76) was a sculptor and medallist of Mantua, whose name appears also as Christophorus Hierimia, Christophorus de Geremiis de Mantua. Filaretus mentions him in 1460 as one of the best contemporary sculptors. In 1461 he went to Rome, and until 1465 remained in the service of the Cardinal of Aquileia, Lodovico Scarampi Mezzarota; after the latter's death he was employed by Pope Paul II. in 1468 he was entrusted with the restoration of the equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius which was then in San Giovanni Laterano. After this date no mention of him occurs in contemporary records, and that leads to the assumption that he must have died in the early years of Sixtus IV's pontificate, whose medal was executed by Lysippus, Christophorus's nephew.
Bibliographic References
  • Inventory of Art Objects acquired in the Year 1865. Inventory of the Objects in the Art Division of the Museum at South Kensington, arranged According to the Dates of their Acquisition. Vol. 1. London : Printed by George E. Eyre and William Spottiswoode for H.M.S.O., 1868, p. 37
  • Robinson, John Charles. Catalogue of the Soulages Collection. London: Chapman & Hall, 1856, p. 141
  • Hill, G. F. A Corpus of Italian Medals of the Renaissance before Cellini. London: British Museum, 1920, no. 754 (i)
Collection
Accession Number
669-1865

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record createdApril 29, 2008
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