Chasuble With Orphreys

1434-1446 (made)
Chasuble With Orphreys thumbnail 1
Chasuble With Orphreys thumbnail 2
+3
images
Not currently on display at the V&A

Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

The chasuble is the main vestment worn by a priest when celebrating Mass. This example is of great historic interest as the orignal owner, the Duke of Warwick (d.1445), can be identified by the heraldic devices on the coats of arms applied to the orphreys.

Chasubles and other church vestments made of rich and fashionable materials were often used to symbolise the status of the owner or donor, as in this case, as well as to show his or her devotion to the church.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Body: Crimson velvet cloth of gold of tissue Orphreys: embroidered with silver-gilt and silve rthread and coloured silks in surface couching, split stitch and satin stitch on linen
Physical Description
Chasuble of crimson pile velvet, embroidered with silver-gilt and silver thread, and coloured silks, in split stitch and couched work on linen. On the orphrey are two identical shields of arms, each bearing the impaled arms of Henry de Beauchamp, Duke of Warwick, and his wife Cicely. The orphreys show the crucifixion of Christ with God the Father above, angels with heraldic shields, and saints.
Dimensions
  • Maximum height: 29cm
  • Maximum width: 22.5cm
Content description
In each case the impaled arms bear:



Dexter (right) for Henry - Quarterly: 1, BEAUCHAMP (Gules, a fess between six cross-crosslets or); 2, CLARE (Or, three chevrons gules); 3, LE DESPENSER (Quarterly argent and gules fretty or, a bendlet sable); 4, NEWBURGH (Chequy or and azure, a chevron ermine)



Sinister (left) for Cicely - Quartlery: 1 and 4, MONTAGU (Argent, a fess of fusils gules) quartering MONTHERMER (Or, an eagle displayed vert); 2 and 3, NEVILLE (Gules, a saltire argent, a label of three points compony argent and azure)



Each shield is held by an angel and flanked by (right) A bear argent, muzzled, collared, and chained gules, to a ragged staff argent, and (left), A griffin or - but here possibly per fess or and argent. The bear and ragged staff were Beauchamp badges, whilst the griffin was used by Montagu in various ways.
Object history
The Revd E. Moore of Spalding (Lincolnshire), documented 1849 and 1866; Ralph Coker Adams- Beck, 1905; purchased by the V&A at the auction of the contents of Bookham Lodge (Surrey), 1907
Production
The shield of arms on the cross orphrey denotes that the chasuble belonged to Henry de Beauchamp, Duke of Warwick (who died in 1445) after his marriage to Lady Cecily Neville in 1434.
Subjects depicted
Summary
The chasuble is the main vestment worn by a priest when celebrating Mass. This example is of great historic interest as the orignal owner, the Duke of Warwick (d.1445), can be identified by the heraldic devices on the coats of arms applied to the orphreys.



Chasubles and other church vestments made of rich and fashionable materials were often used to symbolise the status of the owner or donor, as in this case, as well as to show his or her devotion to the church.
Bibliographic References
  • Spring Gardens Sketch Book (1866–7), pls 12, 13; London 1905, cat. no. v
  • Browne, Clare; Davies, Glyn; Michael, M.A, English Medieval Embroidery: Opus Anglicanum, exhibition catalogue, London, Victoria and Albert Museum (London, 2016), p.258.
Collection
Accession Number
402-1907

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record createdDecember 15, 1999
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