Sampler thumbnail 1
Sampler thumbnail 2
+1
images
Not currently on display at the V&A

Sampler

1739 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

In England and elsewhere in Europe in the 17th century, samplers had developed from personal reference works for embroiderers into a method of instruction and practice for girls learning needlework. This sampler was worked in a needle lace stitch called hollie point, most examples of which date from the second quarter of the 18th century. Hollie point was a practical stitch to learn, used particularly for decorative insertions into baby clothes and occasionally adult garments. Exact counterparts of the patterns worked in hollie-point samplers can be found in surviving clothing.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Linen, embroidered with silk and linen, with cutwork and hollie stitch
Brief Description
Linen sampler decorated with cutwork, lace and embroidery, made by Mary Tredwel, England, 1739.
Physical Description
Linen sampler decorated with cutwork, lace and embroidery. The three main square panels of cutwork are surrounded by a zig-zag border of stylised acorns and flowers worked with cream silk in satin and overcast stitches. Between them are lines of embroidery, worked in satin stitch to form geometric patterns.



The cutwork panels are filled with three bands of reticella and hollie point lace.



The first band consists of four squares of hollie point: one with heart and crowns motifs, one with acorn and crowns, one with lily, and one of diamond pattern. In the centre, there is one square of reticella needle lace.



The second band consists of three large squares: one of hollie point with a parrot and diamond motifs, one of reticella, and one of hollie point with a lamb and floral motifs. Between the squares there are two embroidered plants.



The third band consists of two hollie point squares with floral motifs, followed by a reticella square and two further hollie point squares with floral motifs. The last one is dated 1739.



Between the three bands are two rows of cutwork roundels. Those in the upper row are filled with needle lace stitches, and those in the lower row are filled with needle lace and hollie point flowers. There is a large central oval with the name of the maker worked in hollie point.
Dimensions
  • Height: 29cm
  • Width: 29cm
Marks and Inscriptions
'Mary Tredwel / 1739'
Credit line
Bequeathed by Mary Blanche Dick
Summary
In England and elsewhere in Europe in the 17th century, samplers had developed from personal reference works for embroiderers into a method of instruction and practice for girls learning needlework. This sampler was worked in a needle lace stitch called hollie point, most examples of which date from the second quarter of the 18th century. Hollie point was a practical stitch to learn, used particularly for decorative insertions into baby clothes and occasionally adult garments. Exact counterparts of the patterns worked in hollie-point samplers can be found in surviving clothing.
Bibliographic Reference
Browne, Clare and Jennifer Wearden, eds. Samplers from the Victoria and Albert Museum. London : V&A Publications, 1999. 144 p., ill. ISBN 1851773096.
Collection
Accession Number
T.608-1974

About this object record

Explore the Collections contains over a million catalogue records, and over half a million images. It is a working database that includes information compiled over the life of the museum. Some of our records may contain offensive and discriminatory language, or reflect outdated ideas, practice and analysis. We are committed to addressing these issues, and to review and update our records accordingly.

You can write to us to suggest improvements to the record.

Suggest Feedback

record createdDecember 15, 1999
Record URL