Maud thumbnail 1
Maud thumbnail 2
+2
images
Not currently on display at the V&A

Maud

Furnishing Fabric
1913 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

The Omega Workshops were founded in 1913 by the designer and painter Roger Fry (1866-1934). He brought together a group of artists to design furniture, pottery, glass, textiles and entire schemes of interior decoration. Their radically style, typified by this textile, was far ahead of its time and was influenced by developments in contemporary painting.

In keeping with the painting tradition, Fry believed that designs should not be too mechanical and should show evidence of the artist's hand. The workshops produced six printed linens which were used by the most daring as dress fabrics. The printers are said to have used a secret process to 'preserve the freedom and spontaneity of the original drawing'. 'Maud' was available in four colourways. Vanessa Bell, a painter and designer, was co-ordinator of the Omega Workshops and after they closed in 1919 she continued to design interiors schemes and textiles.

The V&A acquired several Omega textiles in 1919 as it was felt 'they might become great curiosities in the future'.


object details
Category
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Printed linen
Physical Description
Orange, blue-grey and green blocks of colour and a black line form a abstract pattern on a cream coloured plain weave linen ground.
Dimensions
  • Maximum height: 978mm
  • Maximum width: 820mm
Marks and Inscriptions
On the front: 4
Credit line
Given by Mrs Margaret H. Armitage (née Bulley)
Summary
The Omega Workshops were founded in 1913 by the designer and painter Roger Fry (1866-1934). He brought together a group of artists to design furniture, pottery, glass, textiles and entire schemes of interior decoration. Their radically style, typified by this textile, was far ahead of its time and was influenced by developments in contemporary painting.



In keeping with the painting tradition, Fry believed that designs should not be too mechanical and should show evidence of the artist's hand. The workshops produced six printed linens which were used by the most daring as dress fabrics. The printers are said to have used a secret process to 'preserve the freedom and spontaneity of the original drawing'. 'Maud' was available in four colourways. Vanessa Bell, a painter and designer, was co-ordinator of the Omega Workshops and after they closed in 1919 she continued to design interiors schemes and textiles.



The V&A acquired several Omega textiles in 1919 as it was felt 'they might become great curiosities in the future'.
Associated Object
T.388-1913 (Design)
Bibliographic References
  • The European Art of Textiles, Osaka:NHK Kinki Media Plan & Victoria and Albert Museum, 1995, cat. 146.
  • Beyond Bloomsbury. Designs of the Omega Workshops 1913-19, The Courtauld Gallery, London, 2009, p. 116, cat. 34B.
Collection
Accession Number
MISC.2:39-1934

About this object record

Explore the Collections contains over a million catalogue records, and over half a million images. It is a working database that includes information compiled over the life of the museum. Some of our records may contain offensive and discriminatory language, or reflect outdated ideas, practice and analysis. We are committed to addressing these issues, and to review and update our records accordingly.

You can write to us to suggest improvements to the record.

Suggest Feedback

record createdDecember 15, 1999
Record URL