Meeting of the worker-management liaison committee of the Colgate-Palmolive company, Boksburg

Photograph
1980 (photographed)
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Prints & Drawings Study Room, level C
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin


David Goldblatt has photographed the changing political landscape of his native South Africa for over five decades. His documentation of the country throughout the period of Apartheid and its aftermath has established him as the ‘father of South African documentary photography’. However, Goldblatt himself resists being labelled as such. His photographs carefully observe the social, cultural and economic divides that characterise the country and include the series and publications ‘On the Mines’ (1973) ‘Some Afrikaners Photographed’ (1975) ‘Lifetimes under Apartheid’ (1986) ‘The Transported of KwaNdebele’ (1989) and ‘South Africa: the Structure of Things Then’ (1998). In 1989, Goldblatt founded The Market Photography Workshop in Johannesburg. Its aim was to teach visual literacy and photographic skills to young people, particularly those affected by apartheid.

Boksburg is a town in the eastern sprawl of the greater Johannesburg area. From 1979-80, Goldblatt photographed the town and its inhabitants in order to examine life in what he describes as a typical ‘small-town, middle-class, white community’. Goldblatt’s photographs capture everyday scenes and social rituals in a segregated society, a society he describes as being ‘shaped by white dreams and white proprieties’.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
gelatin silver print
Brief Description
'Meeting of the worker-management liaison committee of the Colgate-Palmolive Company, Boksburg', gelatin silver print by David Goldblatt, 1980.
Physical Description
A black and white photograph depicting a meeting. The photograph focusses on two men at a conference table, a white man on the right wearing coat and tie seems to explain something while a black man on the left is listening with his arms crossed.
Dimensions
  • Image height: 26.8cm
  • Image width: 26.8cm
  • Sheet height: 30.3cm
  • Sheet width: 30.3cm
Style
Marks and Inscriptions
  • Copyright by David Goldblatt Box 1464, Johannesburg, South Africa (artist's studio and copyright wetstamp, centre verso)
  • titled, dated 1980, signe (pencil, bottom and right centre verso)
  • various annotations (pencil verso)
Credit line
Gift of David Goldblatt, 1987
Subjects depicted
Places Depicted
Summary


David Goldblatt has photographed the changing political landscape of his native South Africa for over five decades. His documentation of the country throughout the period of Apartheid and its aftermath has established him as the ‘father of South African documentary photography’. However, Goldblatt himself resists being labelled as such. His photographs carefully observe the social, cultural and economic divides that characterise the country and include the series and publications ‘On the Mines’ (1973) ‘Some Afrikaners Photographed’ (1975) ‘Lifetimes under Apartheid’ (1986) ‘The Transported of KwaNdebele’ (1989) and ‘South Africa: the Structure of Things Then’ (1998). In 1989, Goldblatt founded The Market Photography Workshop in Johannesburg. Its aim was to teach visual literacy and photographic skills to young people, particularly those affected by apartheid.



Boksburg is a town in the eastern sprawl of the greater Johannesburg area. From 1979-80, Goldblatt photographed the town and its inhabitants in order to examine life in what he describes as a typical ‘small-town, middle-class, white community’. Goldblatt’s photographs capture everyday scenes and social rituals in a segregated society, a society he describes as being ‘shaped by white dreams and white proprieties’.

Bibliographic References
  • Goldblatt, David. In Boksburg. New York: Errata Editions, 2010. Illustrated plate 10.
  • Goldblatt, David. In Boksburg. Cape Town: The Gallery Press, 1982. Illustrated plate 10.
Collection
Accession Number
E.83-1992

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record createdApril 16, 2008
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