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Photograph - Anuradhapura. Lówá-mahapáya, (the Brazen Palace,) with the Ruwanweli Dágoba in the distance. This building was erected by King Dutugemunu, in the second century, B.C., and obtains its name from the fact that the structure was roofed with brass. It is said to have been originally nine stories high, and to have contained a thousand dormitories for the priests, and other apartments. The ruins now consist of sixteen hundred monolithic stone posts, standing about twelve feet out of ground, and arranged in lines of forty each way. The total length from north to south is 231 feet 2 inches, and from east to west 232 feet 2 inches.
  • Anuradhapura. Lówá-mahapáya, (the Brazen Palace,) with the Ruwanweli Dágoba in the distance. This building was erected by King Dutugemunu, in the second century, B.C., and obtains its name from the fact that the structure was roofed with brass. It is said to have been originally nine stories high, and to have contained a thousand dormitories for the priests, and other apartments. The ruins now consist of sixteen hundred monolithic stone posts, standing about twelve feet out of ground, and arranged in lines of forty each way. The total length from north to south is 231 feet 2 inches, and from east to west 232 feet 2 inches.
    Lawton, Joseph
  • Enlarge image

Anuradhapura. Lówá-mahapáya, (the Brazen Palace,) with the Ruwanweli Dágoba in the distance. This building was erected by King Dutugemunu, in the second century, B.C., and obtains its name from the fact that the structure was roofed with brass. It is said to have been originally nine stories high, and to have contained a thousand dormitories for the priests, and other apartments. The ruins now consist of sixteen hundred monolithic stone posts, standing about twelve feet out of ground, and arranged in lines of forty each way. The total length from north to south is 231 feet 2 inches, and from east to west 232 feet 2 inches.

  • Object:

    Photograph

  • Place of origin:

    Sri Lanka (photographed)

  • Date:

    1870s (photographed)

  • Artist/Maker:

    Lawton, Joseph (photographer)

  • Materials and Techniques:

    Albumen print

  • Museum number:

    2274-1912

  • Gallery location:

    In Storage

This image is of the remains of the first monastery in Sri Lanka. It is said to have been home to a community of a thousand Buddhist monks, its 1600 pillars supporting nine upper storeys surmounted by a bronze roof. The monastry was destoyed over time and reconstructed between 1000-1100 AD. Here, Lawton focuses on the linearity of the columns, creating a stark and striking image.

Joseph Lawton (died 1872), a British commercial photographer, was active in Sri Lanka (then Ceylon) between 1866 and 1872. Though he was initially employed by the firm HC Bryde, by the mid 1860s he had established his own studio in Kandy. Lawton was commissioned by the Archaeological Committee to photograph the main archaeological sites in Sri Lanka. He created a unique series of aesthetically powerful images of Anuradhapura, Mihintale, Polonnaruwa and Sigiriya.

Official photographic surveys conducted by Lawton and others documented the architecture and facilitated antiquarian scholarship. However, as a commercial photographer, Lawton made sure that his photographs were not merely documentary. His images were taken to appeal to tourists and overseas buyers seeking picturesque views of ancient ruins overgrown with creepers and gnarled trees.

Physical description

A large grouping of pillars span the length of the photograph in the middle distance, with an expanse of grass in the foreground. In the background are trees and, in the far distance, a rounded structure topped with a spire sits at the top of a mountain (the Ruwanweli Dágoba). A South Asian man in indigenous dress stands with arms crossed, leaning against a pillar in the centre of the image.

Place of Origin

Sri Lanka (photographed)

Date

1870s (photographed)

Artist/maker

Lawton, Joseph (photographer)

Materials and Techniques

Albumen print

Marks and inscriptions

LAWTON
Written on negative and appears in the bottom left hand corner of the print.

Dimensions

Width: 283 mm photographic print, Height: 212 mm photographic print, Width: 327 mm mount, Height: 258 mm mount

Object history note

This photograph was one of a set given to the museum by Mrs Moberley. Her late husband George Moberley, had collected them while in India and Ceylon during the1860-70s. See Registry file MA/1/M2393

The photograph was initially part of the photographic collection held in the National Art Library. The markings on the mount are an indication of the history of the object, its movement through the museum and the way in which it is categorised.

The mount is white. In the top right hand corner is a label which reads: A.in.ANURADHAPURA. A label printed with the title is pasted on the back of the mount and the museum number is handwritten in the bottom right hand corner. The top of the mount is embossed with the National Art Library seal (partially trimmed off at the top), with the words 'LIBRARY/ VICTORIA AND ALBERT MUSEUM'.

Historical significance: This palace is often referred to as Loha Prasada, or ‘Brazen Palace’ and little is left of the vast building founded by King Dutugemunu (reigned 161-137BC). Once home to a community of 1000 Buddhist monks, whose duties included tending the sacred Bo tree that grows beside it— a cutting from the tree in Bodhgaya under which Buddha found Enlightenment. The palace’s 1600 pillars supported nine upper storeys surmounted by a bronze roof and the whole building was decorated with silver and gems. Now, only the base of the building and columns remain, as seen in this photograph.

Anuradhapura was one of the first centres of Buddhism in Sri Lanka and is the home of some of the most sacred Buddhist sites in the world. It is situated in the North West province, about 200km from Colombo. Anuradhapura was established as Sri Lanka’s first capital in 377 BC by King Pandukhabhaya (437-367 BC), who named it after the constellation Anuradha. He started the complex irrigation works on which it depended and King Devanampiya Tissa, who reigned 250-10 BC, began the first stage of religious building. This building project included the Thuparama Dagoba, Issurumuniyagala, the Maha Vihara, the Sri Maha Bodhi and the Brazen Palace. A branch of the Bodhi tree under which the Buddha was believed to have gained Enlightenment was brought from Bodhgaya in India and successfully transplanted.

Anuradhapura remained the capital city until the 9th century when repeated invasions from south India resulted in the deterioration of its architectural structures and the virtual disuse of its irrigation works. After the 13th century, its political functions were taken over first by Polonnaruwa and then by capitals to the south. In the 1820s Ralph Backhaus, a young British civil servant, mounted a private expedition to search for the remains of the city. Despite widespread public interest in his findings, archaeological research, excavation and restoration were not begun until 1872. The New Town was started in the 1950s and is now the most important Sinhalese city of the north. It currently houses the headquarters of the Sri Lanka Archaeological Survey. In 1988, it was designated a World Heritage Site.

Historical context note

This is one of a series of photographs taken by Lawton of the archaeological sites of Anuradhapura, Mihintale, Polonnaruwa and Sigiriya (1870-71). This series was commissioned by the Archaeological Committee (set up by the Governor of Ceylon in 1868) and became his signature work. Photographic surveys, conducted by Lawton and competitors such as the more prolific commercial firm WLH Skeen and Co., coincided with antiquarian scholarship that emerged as a result of the deforestation necessary to lay roadways, railways and plantations in the last quarter of the nineteenth century. This process was propelled by an expansion of both the export and tourist economies. A colleague of Lawton's proposed that his involvement in the physical labour of clearing the archaeological sites that he photographed contributed to his death. After Lawton's death, many prints were produced by the firm for the tourist market, however, the original negatives were sold to a variety of different clients and are now considered to be lost.

Descriptive line

Photograph of The Brazen Palace (Lohapasada), Anuradhapura, Sri Lanka, by Joseph Lawton, albumen print, 1870-1.

Bibliographic References (Citation, Note/Abstract, NAL no)

Regeneration: A Reappraisal of Photography in Ceylon, 1850-1900. London: British Council, 2000. ISBN 086355444X
Falconer, John. Pattern of photographic surveys: Joseph Lawton in Ceylon. In: Pelizzari, Maria Antonella. ed. Traces of India: Photography, Architecture, and the Politics of Representation, 1850-1900. Montréal: Canadian Centre for Architecture, 2003. 156-173p., ISBN 0920785743.

Labels and date

The Brazen Palace (Lohapasada)
Anuradhapura, reconstructed in 1000–1100
By Joseph Lawton (died 1872)

These are the remains of the first monastery in Sri Lanka. It is said to have been home to a community of a thousand Buddhist monks, its 1600 pillars supporting nine upper storeys surmounted by a bronze roof. Focusing on the linearity of the columns, Lawton has created a stark and striking image.

Albumen print, 1870–1
Museum no. 2274-1912 []

Production Note

Likely printed between 1872 and 1882

Attribution note: This is one of a series of photographs taken by Lawton of the archaeological sites of Anuradhapura, Mihintale, Polonnaruwa and Sigiriya (1870-71), commissioned by the Archaeological Committee which the Governor of Ceylon set up in 1868. Two sets of these photographs were produced by Lawton: one which remained in Sri Lanka (now in such poor condition it is considered to be unusable) and a second which was sent to the Colonial Office in London (first kept in the Library of the Foreign and Commonwealth Office and now in The National Archives). After Lawton's death in 1872, further images were produced by the firm under the supervision of his wife and sold largely to a tourist market. Reprints of this particular photograph appear in an album currently held in the Word and Image Department (PH.1202:85-1920) as well as in the Scott Collection (92/16/3) within the India Office Select Materials of the British Library.

Techniques

Albumen process

Subjects depicted

Buddhism; Archaeological sites

Categories

Photographs; Archaeology

Collection

South & South East Asia Collection

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