Furnishing Fabric

ca. 1790-1799 (made)
Furnishing Fabric thumbnail 1
Not currently on display at the V&A

Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

There are two blue threads in the selvedge of this fabric. In 1774, influenced by developments in the home production of cotton pioneered by Arkright, the previous ban on printing all-cotton fabric in England was removed. One of the terms of the legislation was the requirement that blue threads should be woven into the selvedge of English cotton cloth so that excise officers could distinguish between domestic and imported cotton, and charge a lower rate of duty on the former. This regulation, which lasted until 1811, helps with the identification of printed textiles as English.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Printed cotton
Brief Description
Furnishing fabric of printed cotton, English, ca. 1790-1799
Physical Description
Furnishing fabric of printed cotton. White ground with broad stripes of mixed flowers in a full chintz range of colours, including a passion flower. Between are stripes with a yellow ground and green leaves springing from a blue edged pink lozenge containing a flower reserved in white and outlined in red. There are two blue threads in the selvedge.
Dimensions
  • Repeat height: 36.5cm
  • Length: 38.8in
  • Width: 23.3in
Style
Credit line
Given by Mrs. Cora Ginsburg
Subject depicted
Summary
There are two blue threads in the selvedge of this fabric. In 1774, influenced by developments in the home production of cotton pioneered by Arkright, the previous ban on printing all-cotton fabric in England was removed. One of the terms of the legislation was the requirement that blue threads should be woven into the selvedge of English cotton cloth so that excise officers could distinguish between domestic and imported cotton, and charge a lower rate of duty on the former. This regulation, which lasted until 1811, helps with the identification of printed textiles as English.
Collection
Accession Number
T.428-1976

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record createdDecember 15, 1999
Record URL