Or are you looking for Search the Archives?

Please complete the form to email this item.

Neckpiece

Neckpiece

  • Place of origin:

    London (made)
    Barlaston (ceramic components, made)

  • Date:

    1982 (made)

  • Artist/Maker:

    Ramshaw, Wendy, born 1939 (designer and maker)
    Josiah Wedgwood and Sons (maker)

  • Materials and Techniques:

    Gold, with silver catch and hand-turned white jasper beads

  • Credit Line:

    Given by the artist

  • Museum number:

    M.81-1982

  • Gallery location:

    Jewellery, Rooms 91, The William and Judith Bollinger Gallery, case 37, shelf D, box 3

Wendy Ramshaw is a leading and internationally renowned artist jeweller, who experiments with a wide range of materials and new technologies. Artistically she was always ahead of her time, her designs are distinctive and innovative. She first trained in illustration and textile design. Her early jewellery, made in the early 1960s with her husband David Watkins, used screen-printed acrylic and paper. In about 1970 she turned to working in silver and gold, rapidly establishing a distinctive minimalist style influenced by modernism and industrial design.

In 1978, Wendy Ramshaw and David Watkins became Artists in Residence at the Western Australian Institute of Technology in Perth (now Curtin University) sponsored by the Australian Crafts Council. It was during this period that Ramshaw began working with clay and soon recognized the surface qualities of ceramics in combination with metal.

In the 1980s Wendy Ramshaw, in a continual search for new materials, collaborated with Josiah Wedgwood & Co. of Barlaston, Stoke on Trent, to produce a collection in black basalt and white jasperware stoneware, their traditional wares. The ceramic pieces were made by Wedgwood and then carved and turned in the artist's London studio. The resulting ceramic elements were then assembled into pieces of jewellery using 18 carat yellow gold. Some pieces were limited editions, others unique. The collection was launched in 1982 with a show and catalogue at the Victoria and Albert Museum.

As shown in this necklace of white jasper Ramshaw transforms ceramics into a contemporary form with modern technology. The beads – reminiscent of primitive civilizations – are formed of basic geometric units in simple, yet effective ornamental arrangements.

Physical description

Consisting of a circular neckpiece of gold wire with a cylinder "screw action" catch. Three pendant wires suspended from the neckpiece at fixed angles. The first, a triangle with a conical jasper bead, a circular bead and a small cylinder shaped bead. The second wire, longer, holding three flat circular discs of jasper, the gold wire terminating in a triangular point holding the discs. The third wire, again longer holding a small cylinder shaped piece of jasper and three conical jasper beads, the wire again terminating in a triangular point. The turned ceramic forms were designed by Wendy Ramshaw and produced for her by Wedgwood.

Place of Origin

London (made)
Barlaston (ceramic components, made)

Date

1982 (made)

Artist/maker

Ramshaw, Wendy, born 1939 (designer and maker)
Josiah Wedgwood and Sons (maker)

Materials and Techniques

Gold, with silver catch and hand-turned white jasper beads

Dimensions

Height: 34.5 cm, Width: 14.4 cm, Depth: 2.8 cm

Object history note

Exhibited in the Wendy Ramshaw exhibition which marked the reopening of the Jewellery Gallery in October 1982. The necklace was part of the Wedgwood / Ramshaw Studio Collection and is illusttrated on the cover of the catalogue.

Descriptive line

Gold, silver and white jasper, London, 1982, designed and made by Wendy Ramshaw

Bibliographic References (Citation, Note/Abstract, NAL no)

Wendy Ramshaw ed., Wendy Ramshaw, a retrospective survey 1969-1981, London, 1982. ill. ISBN.0905209273

Materials

Gold; Silver; Jasper

Techniques

Carving; Turning

Categories

Jewellery; Metalwork

Collection

Metalwork Collection

Large image request

Please confirm you are using these images within the following terms and conditions, by acknowledging each of the following key points:

Please let us know how you intend to use the images you will be downloading.