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Giroux Daguerreotype camera

  • Object:

    camera

  • Place of origin:

    Paris (manufactured)

  • Date:

    1839 (manufactured)

  • Artist/Maker:

    Daguerre, Louis, born 1781 - died 1851 (designer)
    Giroux, Alphonse Simone François (manufacturer)

  • Credit Line:

    The Royal Photographic Society Collection at the V&A, acquired with the generous assistance of the National Lottery Heritage Fund and Art Fund

  • Museum number:

    RPS.3042-2017

  • Gallery location:

    Photography Centre, Room 100, The Bern and Ronny Schwartz Gallery, case CA1

Talbot is celebrated today as one of the pioneer inventors of photography. He owned many cameras, ranging from small, crude boxes that his wife called ‘mousetraps’ to sophisticated devices like this. He undoubtedly cannibalised some of his cameras to make new ones, transferring lenses and other fittings. Talbot’s granddaughter, Matilda, brought her grandfather’s legacy to wider attention, donating his photographs and this camera, among other equipment, to the Royal Photographic Society in 1921.

Physical description

Sliding box camera design, wooden construction with a brass lens in the front panel.

Place of Origin

Paris (manufactured)

Date

1839 (manufactured)

Artist/maker

Daguerre, Louis, born 1781 - died 1851 (designer)
Giroux, Alphonse Simone François (manufacturer)

Descriptive line

Giroux Daguerreotype camera, owned and modified by William Henry Fox Talbot for the calotype process. Designed by Louis-Jacques-Mandé Daguerre and manufactured by Alphonse Giroux, the first model of camera on general sale, 1839

Labels and date

Photography Centre 2018-20:

Camera used by William Henry Fox Talbot (1800–77)
Whole-plate camera and tripod
About 1840–45

Talbot is celebrated today as one of the pioneer inventors of photography. He owned many cameras, ranging from small, crude boxes that his wife called ‘mousetraps’ to sophisticated devices like this. He undoubtedly cannibalised some of his cameras to make new ones, transferring lenses and other fittings. Talbot’s granddaughter, Matilda, brought her grandfather’s legacy to wider attention, donating his photographs and this camera, among other equipment, to the Royal Photographic Society in 1921.

Wooden construction camera with wooden tripod
Museum nos. RPS.3042-2017 (camera) & RPS.3043-2017 (tripod)

The Royal Photographic Society Collection at the V&A, acquired with the generous assistance of the Heritage Lottery Fund and Art Fund
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Materials

Wood; Brass; Material

Categories

Cameras; Photographs; The Royal Photographic Society

Collection

Royal Photographic Society Collection

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