Pair of Bracelets thumbnail 1
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Jewellery, Rooms 91, The William and Judith Bollinger Gallery

Pair of Bracelets

1775-1800 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

These bracelets were once mounted on silk ribbon to prevent the wrists being scratched by the sharp links. Brightly polished steel, usually with pierced or faceted decoration, became popular for a wide range of jewellery from buttons, buckles and chatelaines to tiaras, bracelets and sword hilts. Manufacture began in Woodstock, near Oxford in the early 17th century. London, Birmingham and Wolverhampton were important centres of the trade by the 1760s.

Cut steel became popular in Europe as well. It was not only used as a cheap substitute. The inventory made after the death of the French Empress Josephine in 1814 also included two suites of cut-steel jewellery.

Cut steel continued to flit in and out of fashion throughout the 19th century. It was produced in Paris in small quantities until the 1940s.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Parts
This object consists of 2 parts.

  • Bracelet
  • Bracelet
Materials and Techniques
Steel and cut steel
Brief Description
Pair of bracelets, cut steel, England, ca.1775-1800
Physical Description
Pair of Bracelets, steel sequins with cut steel clasps. Three openwork links of flat polished units joined by lateral strips, terminating at each end with oval clasps embellished with steel bosses.
Dimensions
  • Length: 19cm
  • Width: 4cm
Gallery Label
15. PAIR OF BRACELETS, steel sequins with cut steel clasps, Germany; c. 1815 Originally mounted on silk ribbon. Museum No. M.52&a-1969(07/1994)
Credit line
Pfungst Reavil Bequest
Summary
These bracelets were once mounted on silk ribbon to prevent the wrists being scratched by the sharp links. Brightly polished steel, usually with pierced or faceted decoration, became popular for a wide range of jewellery from buttons, buckles and chatelaines to tiaras, bracelets and sword hilts. Manufacture began in Woodstock, near Oxford in the early 17th century. London, Birmingham and Wolverhampton were important centres of the trade by the 1760s.



Cut steel became popular in Europe as well. It was not only used as a cheap substitute. The inventory made after the death of the French Empress Josephine in 1814 also included two suites of cut-steel jewellery.



Cut steel continued to flit in and out of fashion throughout the 19th century. It was produced in Paris in small quantities until the 1940s.
Collection
Accession Number
M.52A-1969

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record createdOctober 31, 2007
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