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Plate

Plate

  • Place of origin:

    Stoke-on-Trent (made)

  • Date:

    ca. 1842-1845 (made)

  • Artist/Maker:

    Minton (maker)

  • Materials and Techniques:

    bone chine, painted and gilded

  • Credit Line:

    Purchased with funds from the Robert Courtenay Stones Bequest, with support from the Friends of the V&A and Société des Amis du Musée national de Céramique.

  • Museum number:

    C.408-2017

  • Gallery location:

    In Storage

This plate was probably designed or made for Prince Albert, circa 1842-45. His full arms are depicted at the top of the plate, while the border features intricate royal insignia including the arms of England, Wales and Scotland, flowers of the Union and Garter badges containing the Rose, the Thistle, shamrock and the Prince of Wales plumes. The centre of the plate shows George and the Dragon in gilding within a laurel wreath.An original design for this plate survives among Prints and Drawings at the Victoria and Albert Museum (ref. E.5901-1910). The registers indicate it was one of a miscellaneous group of 236 drawings and engravings given by Henry Cole’s son Alan, which included designs by Henry Cole, Richard Redgrave and Godfrey Sykes. This particular design shows a pattern of gilt stars in the cavetto instead of the Sèvres-pattern gold scrollwork seen on the plate at Bonhams. It is likely the drawing and this specimen plate played part of the design process for a proposed service commissioned by or intended for Prince Albert. Prince Albert had a close relationship with Herbert Minton, to whom he was introduced by Henry Cole himself. Although the exact circumstances around the design and the production of the sample plate are not clear at the moment, its association with Prince Albert, Henry Cole and Minton make it a very interesting addition to our collections.

Physical description

Round plate, bone china with painted and gilded decoration. The border with very intricate royal insignia featuring the arms of England, Wales and Scotland, flowers of the Union and Garter badges containing the Rose, the Thistle, shamrock and Prince of Wales plumes, the top of the plate with the full arms of Prince Albert, Consort of the Queen, the centre of the plate with George and the Dragon in gilding within a laurel wreath, 23.5cm diam

Place of Origin

Stoke-on-Trent (made)

Date

ca. 1842-1845 (made)

Artist/maker

Minton (maker)

Materials and Techniques

bone chine, painted and gilded

Dimensions

Diameter: 23.5 cm whole

Object history note

The plate was probably designed or made for Prince Albert, circa 1842-45. His full arms are depicted at the top of the plate, while the border features intricate royal insignia including the arms of England, Wales and Scotland, flowers of the Union and Garter badges containing the Rose, the Thistle, shamrock and the Prince of Wales plumes. The centre of the plate shows George and the Dragon in gilding within a laurel wreath.

Previously in the Geoffrey Godden Reference Collection; Christie's sale 12 October 1987, lot 266; Mercury Antiques, Liane Richards; Private Collection, London until 2017 when bought by the V&A from Bonhams, Knightsbridge, London, sale 24158: FINE GLASS AND BRITISH CERAMICS, 17 May 2017, Lot 396.

Descriptive line

Specimen plate, bone china, made by Minton, Stoke-on-Trent, designed for Prince Albert, ca. 1842-45

Production Note

An original design for this plate survives in the Prints and Drawings collection at the Victoria and Albert Museum (ref. E.5901-1910). The registers indicate it was one of a miscellaneous group of 236 drawings and engravings given by Henry Cole’s son Alan, which included designs by Henry Cole, Redgrave, Sykes, Townsend, etc. This particular design shows a pattern of gilt stars in the cavetto instead of the Sèvres-pattern gold scrollwork seen on the plate at Bonhams. It is likely the drawing and this specimen plate played part of the design process for a proposed service commissioned by or intended for Prince Albert.

The design is losely based on eighteenth-century Sèvres production, favoured by British collectors in the nineteenth century. The style was extremely popular for consumers of modern ceramic production. The closest design is the service 'Ordinaire de Fontainebleau', commissioned in 1836 by Louis-Philippe, King of France, for use at Château de Fontainebleau.

Materials

Bone china

Techniques

Painted; Gilded

Categories

Ceramics

Production Type

Prototype

Collection

Ceramics Collection

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