Salt and Pepper Cellar

1904 (made)
Not currently on display at the V&A

Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Josef Hoffmann studied architecture at the Academy of Fine Arts in Vienna under Carl von Hasenauer and Otto Wagner and was influenced by their theories of a functional, modernist architecture. After winning the Rome prize in 1895 and joining Wagner's office, he established his own office in 1898 and taught at the Vienna Kunstgewerbeschule from 1899 to 1936. He was a founding member of the Vienna Secession, an avant-garde group of artists and architects. In 1903 he founded the Wiener Werkstätte with Koloman Moser. Hoffmann's earliest works reflect the Vienna Secession's variant of Art Nouveau and his later work shows a pioneering use of geometric and abstract design. His most famous building, the Palais Stoclet in Brussels, built 1905-1911, exemplifies the ideal of the 'Gesamtkunstwerk' or 'total work of art'.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Parts
This object consists of 3 parts.

  • Salt and Pepper Cellar
  • Liner for a Salt and Pepper Cellar
  • Liner for a Salt and Pepper Cellar
Materials and Techniques
Silver with two glass liners
Brief Description
Silver salt and pepper cellar, designed by Josef Hoffmann and made by the Wiener Werkstatte, 1904.
Physical Description
The base of the cellar has two rectangular sections removed so that the remaining edges form a support to contain the two glass liners. The walls of the long rectangular box containing these liners are plain apart from four embossed pellets, rising vertically for the entire height, in the centre of the two longer sides. The two liners are furthermore separated by a folded section of silver, forming two internal walls on the inner sides and a narrow strip of metal across the width of the vessel, forming the base for the handle. The two sides of the handle are inset slightly from the edge of the vessel and rise vertically, parallel to the sides of the vessel itself.
Dimensions
  • Height: 12.5cm
  • Length: 10.2cm
  • Width: 4cm
Style
Marks and Inscriptions
Marks for the Wiener Werkstatte, Josef Hoffmann, the Austrian discharge mark for silver and the maker's mark, AW within a circle.
Object history
The salt and pepper cellar was exhibited in Vienna in 1980, in Groningen in 1982 and at the Edinburgh Festival from August to September 1983.
Summary
Josef Hoffmann studied architecture at the Academy of Fine Arts in Vienna under Carl von Hasenauer and Otto Wagner and was influenced by their theories of a functional, modernist architecture. After winning the Rome prize in 1895 and joining Wagner's office, he established his own office in 1898 and taught at the Vienna Kunstgewerbeschule from 1899 to 1936. He was a founding member of the Vienna Secession, an avant-garde group of artists and architects. In 1903 he founded the Wiener Werkstätte with Koloman Moser. Hoffmann's earliest works reflect the Vienna Secession's variant of Art Nouveau and his later work shows a pioneering use of geometric and abstract design. His most famous building, the Palais Stoclet in Brussels, built 1905-1911, exemplifies the ideal of the 'Gesamtkunstwerk' or 'total work of art'.
Bibliographic References
  • Moderne Vergangenheit. Vienna, 1980, p. 310, cat. no. 243.
  • Vienna 1900: Vienna, Scotland and the European Avant-garde. Cat. no. 2.44 (incorrect).
Collection
Accession Number
M.9 to B-1982

About this object record

Explore the Collections contains over a million catalogue records, and over half a million images. It is a working database that includes information compiled over the life of the museum. Some of our records may contain offensive and discriminatory language, or reflect outdated ideas, practice and analysis. We are committed to addressing these issues, and to review and update our records accordingly.

You can write to us to suggest improvements to the record.

Suggest Feedback

record createdAugust 23, 2007
Record URL