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Day dress
  • Day dress
    Worth, Charles Frederick, born 1825 - died 1895
  • Enlarge image

Day dress

  • Place of origin:

    Paris (made)

  • Date:

    ca. 1889 (made)

  • Artist/Maker:

    Worth, Charles Frederick, born 1825 - died 1895 (designer and maker)

  • Materials and Techniques:

    Wool, with figured satin panels, edged with moiré ribbon, lined with silk, boned, pleats, gold beaded tulle

  • Credit Line:

    Given by Major and Mrs Broughton

  • Museum number:

    T.268&A-1972

  • Gallery location:

    In Storage

With its minimal bustle and strong emphasis on the sleeves, this day dress illustrates the smoother silhouette that began to appear in the late 1880s. It is said to have been worn by Cara Leland Huttleston Rogers of New York, later Lady Fairhaven.

The bodice is waist length, panelled with satin and edged with black moiré ribbon. It is trimmed at the back with a made-up bow with long pendant ends. The dress fastens at the shoulder over a boned, green silk bodice lining. The sleeves are long with a high pleated shoulder. Collar and cuffs are faced with gold beaded tulle. The skirt has a slightly draped front, with the back flared and arranged in deep pleats. It is mounted over a green silk petticoat, and boned and taped to a bustle shape at the back. The skirt may have been altered and have lost a side panel.

A machine-woven label 'Worth Paris' has been stitched to the waist tape. Charles Frederick Worth (1825-95) was a celebrated Parisian couture dressmaker. He was born in 1825 in Bourne, Lincolnshire, and started working at the age of 12 in a draper's shop in London. Eight years later he moved to Paris, where he opened his own premises in 1858. He was soon patronised by the Empress Eugenie and her influence was instrumental to his success. Made-to-measure clothes from Worth, as from the other great Parisian fashion houses, were an important symbol of social and financial advancement.

Physical description

Day dress consisting of a bodice and skirt of dark green wool and red-ground silk brocade with a floral pattern. The bodice is waist-length, panelled with satin and edged with black moiré ribbon. It is trimmed at the back with a made-up bow with long pendant ends. The dress fastens at the shoulder over a boned green silk bodice lining. The sleeves are long with a high pleated shoulder. Collar and cuffs are faced with gold beaded tulle.

The skirt has a slightly draped front, with the back flared and arranged in deep pleats. It is mounted over a green silk petticoat, and boned and taped to a bustle shape at the back. The skirt fastens at the back with hooks and eyes. It may have been altered and have lost a side panel. A machine-woven label 'WORTH PARIS' has been stitched to the waist tape.

Place of Origin

Paris (made)

Date

ca. 1889 (made)

Artist/maker

Worth, Charles Frederick, born 1825 - died 1895 (designer and maker)

Materials and Techniques

Wool, with figured satin panels, edged with moiré ribbon, lined with silk, boned, pleats, gold beaded tulle

Object history note

This dress was owned by Cara Broughton, née Cara Leland Huttleston Rogers (1867-1939), who married Urban Hanlon Broughton (1857-1929) in 1895. As Urban H. Broughton died before he could be elevated to a peerage, their eldest son Urban H.R. Broughton (1896-1966) became 1st Baron Fairhaven of Lode on 20 March 1929, while Cara became 1st Lady Fairhaven. This barony became extinct on Urban H.R.Broughton's death, but a later barony, Baron Fairhaven of Anglesey Abbey, co. Cambridge, was granted to him in 1961, with a remainder to his brother, Henry (1900-1973), to enable this title to continue after his death without male heirs.

This forms part of a large donation of late 19th and early 20th century garments and accessories (with a few historical textiles) donated to the Museum in 1972 by Cara's grandson and Henry's son, Major Ailwyn Broughton and his wife, a year before Ailwyn became Lord Fairhaven following his father's death.

Some of the nineteenth century garments are thought to have been worn by Cara's sister, Anne (1865-1924), although the relative severity and simplicity of this dress would have been considered appropriate for the young and unmarried daughter of a wealthy American family.

Descriptive line

Day dress of wool and silk brocade, designed by Charles Frederick Worth, Paris, ca. 1889

Materials

Wool; Satin; Braid

Techniques

Woven; Woven; Woven

Categories

Fashion; Women's clothes; Textiles; Day wear; Europeana Fashion Project

Collection

Textiles and Fashion Collection

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