Or are you looking for Search the Archives?

Please complete the form to email this item.

Dress fabric

Dress fabric

  • Place of origin:

    England (made)

  • Date:

    ca. 1740 (made)

  • Artist/Maker:

    Unknown

  • Materials and Techniques:

    Brocaded silk

  • Credit Line:

    Given by C K Probert

  • Museum number:

    1746&A-1869

  • Gallery location:

    In Storage

Traces of pleats show that this panel of silk was originally part of a woman's gown. Although it does not contain any gold or silver thread, it would have been recognised as expensive fabric by an eighteenth century viewer, because of the complexity of its weave, with thirteen different colours making up the pattern. The colours have been brocaded.

The technique of brocading allowed different colours to be introduced into the pattern of a fabric in specific, sometimes very small areas. It was a more laborious process for the weaver than using patterning wefts running from selvedge to selvedge, but the resulting effect could be much more varied and lively.

In this silk there is an element of fantasy with plants of different scale juxtaposed, but most have been drawn to resemble real trees and flowers, including cherry blossom, rose buds, and tulips, with the variegated colouring in their petals that made them so popular with plant collectors.

Physical description

Plain woven pink silk, with white silk supplementary weft. Brocaded in 13 colours, with complex binding within the brocading.
Selvedges : pale blue stripe, white stripe, pink and blue cords (right, blue cords (left).

Place of Origin

England (made)

Date

ca. 1740 (made)

Artist/maker

Unknown

Materials and Techniques

Brocaded silk

Dimensions

Length: 65 cm pattern repeat

Descriptive line

Dress fabric, Brocaded silk, 1740s, England

Materials

Silk

Techniques

Brocading

Categories

Textiles; Europeana Fashion Project

Collection

Textiles and Fashion Collection

Large image request

Please confirm you are using these images within the following terms and conditions, by acknowledging each of the following key points:

Please let us know how you intend to use the images you will be downloading.