We don’t have an image of this object online yet. V&A Images may have a photograph that we can’t show online, but it may be possible to supply one to you. Email us at vaimages@vam.ac.uk for guidance about fees and timescales, quoting the accession number: W.7-2016
Find out about our images

Not currently on display at the V&A

Table Leg

2006 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

These four prototype table legs (W.6-2016, W.7-2016, W.8-2016, W.9-2016) relate to another object in the V&A collection, the ‘George’ chest of drawers (W.14-2013), which was purchased through the Design Fund in 2013. As prototypes, they show a clear progression of thought by the maker, Gareth Neal. In his words, they demonstrate his ‘journey to George’. Made in 2006 using cheap timber, each prototype took about a day to make.

With this second prototype Neal went further with the removal of the horizontal planes, deliberately breaking all of them off close to their roots. It was at this point he realised it was not the raw, broken appearance that he liked, but the relationship between the clean-cut lines of the first prototype and the ragged stubs left by the accidental breakages.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Pine cut with a bandsaw
Brief Description
Prototype table leg, pine cut with a bandsaw; Gareth Neal, London, 2006
Physical Description
Prototype table leg, pine cut with a bandsaw forming horizontal planes. Most of the planes have been deliberately chiselled off close to the leg.

Production typePrototype
Credit line
Given by Gareth Neal
Object history
Handmade by Gareth Neal in 2006. Neal gave these pieces (W.6-2016, W.7-2016, W.8-2016 and W.9-2016) to the V&A in 2016 [2016/55].

Summary
These four prototype table legs (W.6-2016, W.7-2016, W.8-2016, W.9-2016) relate to another object in the V&A collection, the ‘George’ chest of drawers (W.14-2013), which was purchased through the Design Fund in 2013. As prototypes, they show a clear progression of thought by the maker, Gareth Neal. In his words, they demonstrate his ‘journey to George’. Made in 2006 using cheap timber, each prototype took about a day to make.



With this second prototype Neal went further with the removal of the horizontal planes, deliberately breaking all of them off close to their roots. It was at this point he realised it was not the raw, broken appearance that he liked, but the relationship between the clean-cut lines of the first prototype and the ragged stubs left by the accidental breakages.

Associated Objects
Collection
Accession Number
W.7-2016

About this object record

Explore the Collections contains over a million catalogue records, and over half a million images. It is a working database that includes information compiled over the life of the museum. Some of our records may contain offensive and discriminatory language, or reflect outdated ideas, practice and analysis. We are committed to addressing these issues, and to review and update our records accordingly.

You can write to us to suggest improvements to the record.

Suggest Feedback

record createdJanuary 25, 2016
Record URL