Image of Gallery in South Kensington
Request to view at the Prints & Drawings Study Room, level C , Case MB2E, Shelf DR54, Box Digital Art

Human Figure

Print
1968 (printed)
Artist/Maker
Place of origin

This is one of a set of seven prints by different artists, published by Motif Editions in connection with Cybernetic Serendipity, a major exhibition held at London's Institute of Contemporary Arts in 1968. The portfolio includes two works by the Computer Technique Group, plus single works by Charles Csuri and James Shaffer, William Fetter, Maughan S. Mason, Donald K. Robbins, and Kerry Strand.

Fetter worked for the Boeing aircraft company, where he produced some of the first computer-aided drawings of the human figure. His ergonomic studies, such as this one, contributed to the design of the Boeing aeroplane cockpit. Fetter was one of the first people to use the term "computer graphics" and his wire-frame image of the pilot became known as "Boeing Man".


Object details
Categories
Object type
Materials and techniques
printer's ink, paper, lithograph
Brief description
Human Figure, Boeing Computer Graphics, lithograph by William Fetter, 1968
Physical description
Ergonomic study of the movements of a computer-generated human figure
Dimensions
  • Height: 49.6cm
  • Length: 73.5cm
Gallery label
Fetter worked for the Boeing aircraft company, where he produced some of the first computer-aided drawings of the human figure. His ergonomic studies, such as this one, contributed to the design of the Boeing 747's cockpit. This print was published in connection with Cybernetic Serendipity, a ground-breaking exhibition at the Institute of Contemporary Arts in 1968.
Credit line
Given by the Computer Arts Society, supported by System Simulation Ltd, London
Production
Published by Motif Editions
Summary
This is one of a set of seven prints by different artists, published by Motif Editions in connection with Cybernetic Serendipity, a major exhibition held at London's Institute of Contemporary Arts in 1968. The portfolio includes two works by the Computer Technique Group, plus single works by Charles Csuri and James Shaffer, William Fetter, Maughan S. Mason, Donald K. Robbins, and Kerry Strand.



Fetter worked for the Boeing aircraft company, where he produced some of the first computer-aided drawings of the human figure. His ergonomic studies, such as this one, contributed to the design of the Boeing aeroplane cockpit. Fetter was one of the first people to use the term "computer graphics" and his wire-frame image of the pilot became known as "Boeing Man".

Collection
Accession number
E.2712-2016

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Record createdSeptember 18, 2015
Record URL
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