Not currently on display at the V&A

Popular Gardens - Tom, Jerry and Logic laughing at the bustle and alarm occasioned amongst the Visitors by the escape of a Kangaroo. The 'Fat Knight' down on the subject. Engraving by Robert Cruikshank.

Engraving
1830 (printed)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

This engraving was originally published as an illustration to Pierce Egan’s second series of accounts of life in London lived by Jerry Hawthorn and his friends Corinthian Tom and Bob Logic. In it we see the furore created by the escape of a kangaroo at London Zoo, especially on the character called 'the Fat Knight' whom Corinthian Tom in the story meets in the village of Pickwick, and who some have seen as Dickens' inspiration for his much better-known portly character Mr. Pickwick.

Pierce Egan (1772-1849) was a sporting journalist who made his name with the monthly journal Life in London, or The day and night scenes of Jerry Hawthorn, esq., and his elegant friend, Corinthian Tom, accompanied by Bob Logic, the Oxonian, in their rambles and sprees through the metropolis. Costing a shilling an issue and published from 1821 until 1822, the picaresque tales illustrated by the brothers George and Robert Cruikshank incorporated stories of the follies of fashionable society and everyday London life and were instantly popular, spawning pirate editions and stage versions, one superintended by Robert Cruikshank. The monthly instalments of the story ended in 1822, but Egan returned to the theme in 1828, rebuking the pirates and plagiarists with his Finish to the adventures of Tom, Jerry, and Logic, illustrated by Robert Cruikshank.



object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Printed paper
Brief Description
Hand-coloured etching of Tom, Jerry, Logic and 'the Fat Knight' at London Zoo. Plate from Pierce Egan's The Finish to the Adventures of Tom, Jerry & Logic, 1828. Engraving by Robert Cruikshank
Physical Description
Hand-coloured etching depicting a group of top-hatted men attempting to capture a kangaroo at London Zo with a rope, while the kangaroo causes panic amidst fleeing zoo visitors. The oversized gentleman known as 'the Fat Knight lies in the foreground, with various enclosures behind, and animals including a monkey, a giraffe, eagles, stags, and two bears - one balancing on the other.





Dimensions
  • Height: 15.3cm
  • Width: 25.0cm
Marks and Inscriptions
Credit line
Acquired with the support of the Friends of the V&A
Subject depicted
Places Depicted
Association
Summary
This engraving was originally published as an illustration to Pierce Egan’s second series of accounts of life in London lived by Jerry Hawthorn and his friends Corinthian Tom and Bob Logic. In it we see the furore created by the escape of a kangaroo at London Zoo, especially on the character called 'the Fat Knight' whom Corinthian Tom in the story meets in the village of Pickwick, and who some have seen as Dickens' inspiration for his much better-known portly character Mr. Pickwick.



Pierce Egan (1772-1849) was a sporting journalist who made his name with the monthly journal Life in London, or The day and night scenes of Jerry Hawthorn, esq., and his elegant friend, Corinthian Tom, accompanied by Bob Logic, the Oxonian, in their rambles and sprees through the metropolis. Costing a shilling an issue and published from 1821 until 1822, the picaresque tales illustrated by the brothers George and Robert Cruikshank incorporated stories of the follies of fashionable society and everyday London life and were instantly popular, spawning pirate editions and stage versions, one superintended by Robert Cruikshank. The monthly instalments of the story ended in 1822, but Egan returned to the theme in 1828, rebuking the pirates and plagiarists with his Finish to the adventures of Tom, Jerry, and Logic, illustrated by Robert Cruikshank.



Bibliographic Reference
Other Number
Collection
Accession Number
S.1677-2014

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record createdSeptember 29, 2014
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