Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Request to view at the Prints & Drawings Study Room, level D , Case DR, Shelf 74

Design

ca.1870
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

This is a design drawing in pencil and ink on tracing paper for the organ case for Cobham Church, Surrey by Philip Webb. The design is undated, but it is part of a project begun in 1870. The drawing shows a plan of the organ case with a sketch of the joinery and a large view of the moulding. Cobham Church is the church of Saint Andrew, parts of which Webb was commissioned to restore in the early 1870s.
Philip Speakman Webb (Oxford, 1831-Sussex, 1915) was a prominent British architect who designed numerous buildings throughout Great Britain. Known for his contributions to British vernacular architecture, Webb was also a skilled draughtsman, and designer of tableware, tiles, stained glass, and furniture. He also designed gravestones and memorials for his friends and clients. Webb lent his hand to many collaborative projects and worked closely with his colleagues, namely William Morris, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, and Edward Burne Jones. His precise drawings of animals, particularly birds, frequently adorn tiles, stained glass, textiles, and wallpaper produced by Morris and Co. Webb is best known for designing Morris’ Red House in Bexleyheath, as well as Clouds House, Naworth Castle, and several London town houses. Among his other accomplishments, Webb is attributed with laying the groundwork for the Arts and Crafts and Modern movements, establishing longstanding principles in historic preservation, and creating some of the most influential designs still studied and celebrated today.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Brief Description
Design drawing for organ case for Cobham Church, Surrey by Philip Webb, ca.1870
Physical Description
This is a design drawing in pencil and ink on tracing paper for the organ case for Cobham Church, Surrey by Philip Webb. The design is undated, but it is part of a project begun in 1870. The drawing shows a plan of the organ case with a sketch of the joinery and a large view of the moulding.
Dimensions
  • Length: 75cm
  • Height: 51cm
Credit line
Accepted in lieu of Inheritance Tax by H M Government from the estate of John Brandon-Jones and allocated to the Victoria and Albert Museum, 2014
Object history
This object is part of a set of 278 designs and drawings formerly in the collection of John Brandon-Jones. Brandon-Jones was an architect and architectural historian.
Summary
This is a design drawing in pencil and ink on tracing paper for the organ case for Cobham Church, Surrey by Philip Webb. The design is undated, but it is part of a project begun in 1870. The drawing shows a plan of the organ case with a sketch of the joinery and a large view of the moulding. Cobham Church is the church of Saint Andrew, parts of which Webb was commissioned to restore in the early 1870s.

Philip Speakman Webb (Oxford, 1831-Sussex, 1915) was a prominent British architect who designed numerous buildings throughout Great Britain. Known for his contributions to British vernacular architecture, Webb was also a skilled draughtsman, and designer of tableware, tiles, stained glass, and furniture. He also designed gravestones and memorials for his friends and clients. Webb lent his hand to many collaborative projects and worked closely with his colleagues, namely William Morris, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, and Edward Burne Jones. His precise drawings of animals, particularly birds, frequently adorn tiles, stained glass, textiles, and wallpaper produced by Morris and Co. Webb is best known for designing Morris’ Red House in Bexleyheath, as well as Clouds House, Naworth Castle, and several London town houses. Among his other accomplishments, Webb is attributed with laying the groundwork for the Arts and Crafts and Modern movements, establishing longstanding principles in historic preservation, and creating some of the most influential designs still studied and celebrated today.

Associated Objects
Collection
Accession Number
E.513-2014

About this object record

Explore the Collections contains over a million catalogue records, and over half a million images. It is a working database that includes information compiled over the life of the museum. Some of our records may contain offensive and discriminatory language, or reflect outdated ideas, practice and analysis. We are committed to addressing these issues, and to review and update our records accordingly.

You can write to us to suggest improvements to the record.

Suggest Feedback

record createdJune 17, 2014
Record URL