Not currently on display at the V&A

Money Box

ca. 1800-15
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

As the quickest way to extract coins from simple pottery money boxes is to smash them, it is perhaps not surprising they are uncommon objects today. This rare pottery survivor is made of salt-glazed stoneware. Its surfaces have been decorated with applied 'sprigs', stamped clay decoration of horses and hounds, a man drinking ale and windmills. These subjects traditionally decorated ale mugs and jugs used in taverns and homes from the early 1700s onwards. This item also has applied medallions applied to the top surface, perhaps intended to resemble coins in reference to its purpose. It was probably made in a pottery which specialised in making mugs and bottles for everyday use. The most likely candidate for the pottery which made this moneybox is Joseph Kishere's Mortlake Pottery on the banks of the River Thames in the early 1800s.


object details
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Slab-built with applied stamped sprigs of different subjects
Brief Description
Money box, salt-glazed stoneware, made in England, ca. 1810
Physical Description
Money box of rectangular shape with sprigged decoration: a seated toper flanked by windmills with a line of hounds on both long sides and, on both short sides, a mounted huntsman pursuing a bushy-tailed fox, the rims with running borders of small flower sprigs. The top has applied stamped medallions, perhaps intended to resemble coins in reference to object’s purpose. The upper part of the box has a tan dip while the lower part is buff-coloured.
Dimensions
  • Height: 8.8cm
  • Length: 13.6cm
  • Width: 9cm
Credit line
Given by Sir Harry Djanogly CBE
Object history
This item is reputed to have formerly been in the Longridge Collection amassed by the east coast American collector Syd Levethan during the second half of the 20th century. The majority of this collection was sold by Christie’s 10-11th June, King St., London, 2010
Subjects depicted
Summary
As the quickest way to extract coins from simple pottery money boxes is to smash them, it is perhaps not surprising they are uncommon objects today. This rare pottery survivor is made of salt-glazed stoneware. Its surfaces have been decorated with applied 'sprigs', stamped clay decoration of horses and hounds, a man drinking ale and windmills. These subjects traditionally decorated ale mugs and jugs used in taverns and homes from the early 1700s onwards. This item also has applied medallions applied to the top surface, perhaps intended to resemble coins in reference to its purpose. It was probably made in a pottery which specialised in making mugs and bottles for everyday use. The most likely candidate for the pottery which made this moneybox is Joseph Kishere's Mortlake Pottery on the banks of the River Thames in the early 1800s.
Bibliographic References
  • Hildyard, Robin. Browne Muggs, Victoria and Albert Museum exhibition catalogue, 1985.
  • Howarth, Jack and Hildyard, R. Joseph Kishere and the Mortlake Potteries, Antique Collectors’ Club, Suffolk 2004.
Collection
Accession Number
C.213-2014

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record createdJune 12, 2014
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