Dress thumbnail 1
Dress thumbnail 2
+3
images
Not currently on display at the V&A

Dress

1837-1840 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

This 1830s day dress is made of challis printed with a realistic design of wild strawberries, bamboo, pinks and anemones. In the nineteenth century a fascination with flowers in printed textile design was nothing new, but during the 1830s it received a new impetus. Technical improvements to the printing process and advances in dye chemistry meant that floral prints could be mass-produced at low prices, and the repeal of excise duty on printed textiles in 1831 helped to reduce costs.

Inspiration for floral designs came from a variety of sources, including botanical engravings, pattern books and plants grown in gardens and conservatories.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Printed challis, lined with glazed cotton and linen
Brief Description
Day dress of printed challis and lined with glazed cotton and linen, Great Britain, 1837-1840
Physical Description
Day dress of challis printed with flowers and lined with glazed cotton and linen. Cut low at the neck with a ruched collar trimming, long sleeves pleated in the upper part, wide at the elbows and narrow at the wrists. The skirt is long and full. The printed challis consists of interlacing bamboo-like and slender stems bearing small flowers and detached sprigs on a ground striped in white.
Dimensions
  • Top centre bust to hem (front of dress) length: 119cm
  • Waist circumference: 28.5cm (Note: When measured flat )
Credit line
Given by Miss E. Tucker
Subjects depicted
Summary
This 1830s day dress is made of challis printed with a realistic design of wild strawberries, bamboo, pinks and anemones. In the nineteenth century a fascination with flowers in printed textile design was nothing new, but during the 1830s it received a new impetus. Technical improvements to the printing process and advances in dye chemistry meant that floral prints could be mass-produced at low prices, and the repeal of excise duty on printed textiles in 1831 helped to reduce costs.



Inspiration for floral designs came from a variety of sources, including botanical engravings, pattern books and plants grown in gardens and conservatories.
Collection
Accession Number
T.184-1931

About this object record

Explore the Collections contains over a million catalogue records, and over half a million images. It is a working database that includes information compiled over the life of the museum. Some of our records may contain offensive and discriminatory language, or reflect outdated ideas, practice and analysis. We are committed to addressing these issues, and to review and update our records accordingly.

You can write to us to suggest improvements to the record.

Suggest Feedback

record createdNovember 14, 2006
Record URL