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Vase

  • Place of origin:

    Deruta (possibly, made)

  • Date:

    ca. 1515 (made)

  • Artist/Maker:

    Unknown

  • Materials and Techniques:

    Tin-glazed earthenware

  • Credit Line:

    Bequeathed by George Salting, Esq.

  • Museum number:

    C.2287-1910

  • Gallery location:

    Medieval & Renaissance, Room 62, case 9

The dissemination, during the Middle Ages,of pharmacopoeias and antidotaria, listing the ingredients, preparation and medicinal properties of hundreds of natural rememdies, brought about an increasing demand for appropriate storage vessels. Pharmacies were, subsequently, a major market for maiolica. The pharmacies and dispensaries of monastic orders, hospitals and noble families required large numbers of jars to store their various herbs, roots, syrups, pills, oinments and sweetmeats. These were sometimes marked with coats of arms or other heraldic devices. The production of drug jars inscribed with their contents began in the middle of the fifteenth century, although, non-inscribed vessels continued to be used enabling their contents to be changed as required.

The globular syrup jar was a favourite form of drug vessel in Tuscany. The patricachal cross above the heraldic shield indicates this jug was intended for a monastic pharmacy. Decorative themes favoured by Tuscan potters in the first half of the sixteenth century include formal foliage, flowers springing from urns, stylised pine cones and heraldic beasts.

Physical description

Pharmacutical jug with handle formed of two flat conjoined bands, and spout connected by a twisted link with the neck. On the front, a scrolled lable with the name of the contents: SYo DI PAPAVARI, with, above it, an almond-shaped shield with the letters D in chief and No in base, surmounted by a patriachal cross. the label is reserved on a blue ground amongst horned monsters, dolphins, conventional flowers on coiled stems, a basket of fruit and a grotesque mask, in a panel flanked by narrow bands of interlaced ornament; on the neck, above a ring of similar interlacements, leafy stems in narrow vertical panels.

Place of Origin

Deruta (possibly, made)

Date

ca. 1515 (made)

Artist/maker

Unknown

Materials and Techniques

Tin-glazed earthenware

Dimensions

Height: 24.2 cm, Diameter: 18.2 cm, Weight: 1.460 kg

Object history note

Previously in the Hastings Collection. Bequeathed by Mr. George Salting

Historical significance: The globular syrup jar was a favourite form of drug vessel in Tuscany. The patricachal cross above the heraldic shield indicates this jug was intended for a monastic pharmacy. Decorative themes favoured by Tuscan potters in the first half of the sixteenth century include formal foliage, flowers springing from urns, stylised pine cones and heraldic beasts.

Historical context note

The dissemination, during the Middle Ages,of pharmacopoeias and antidotaria, listing the ingredients, preparation and medicinal properties of hundreds of natural rememdies, brought about an increasing demand for appropriate storage vessels. Pharmacies were, subsequently, a major market for maiolica. The pharmacies and dispensaries of monastic orders, hospitals and noble families required large numbers of jars to store their various herbs, roots, syrups, pills, oinments and sweetmeats. These were sometimes marked with coats of arms or other heraldic devices. The production of drug jars inscribed with their contents began in the middle of the fifteenth century, although, non-inscribed vessels continued to be used enabling their contents to be changed as required.

Descriptive line

Phamaceutical jug, made in Cafaggiolo, ca. 1515

Bibliographic References (Citation, Note/Abstract, NAL no)

Drey, R. Apothecary Jars: pharmaceutical pottery and porcelain in Europe and the East 1150-1850. London, 1978
Rackham, B. Italian Maiolica. London: Faber &Faber, 1952
Rasmussen, J. Italian Maiolica in the Robert Lehman Collection. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1987
Watson, Wendy M. Italian Renaissance Ceramics From the Howard I. And Janet H. Stein Collection and the Philadelphia Museum of Art, exh.cat. Philadelphia, The Philadelphia Museum of Art, 2001

Materials

Tin-glazed earthenware

Techniques

Painted

Categories

Ceramics; Earthenware

Collection

Ceramics Collection

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