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Plate

  • Place of origin:

    Gubbio (made)

  • Date:

    1510-1530 (made)

  • Artist/Maker:

    Unknown

  • Materials and Techniques:

    Tin-glazed earthenware

  • Museum number:

    8905-1863

  • Gallery location:

    Medieval & Renaissance, Room 63, The Edwin and Susan Davies Gallery, case 8

During the eighth century Iraqi potters began to apply a lustring technique to their work. Taken from glass production, the lustre was created by applying metal compounds to the surface of a usually tin-glazed vessel, which was then submitted to a reduction firing. During this firing, the air supply was reduced causing the resulting carbon monoxide to react with the metallic compounds, converting them in to an irridescent film. Islamic lustre ware was imported in to Italy and can still be seen in the form of basins, or bacini, embedded in the walls of some churches.

By the thirteenth century, the lustring technique had spread through the Islamic world to southern Spain from where it gradually spread northward in to Christian territory. Active trade between the ports of Mansises and Pisa introduced lustre ware to Italy and by the second half of the fifteenth century, the technique had been mastered by the potters at Deruta and shortly after at Gubbio. The former potteries specialised in a straw-coloured lustre, whereas the latter developed a rich ruby-coloured sheen. In this instance, the Islamic technique of lustring is juxtaposed with the Sacred Monogram.

Physical description

Bowl. Painted in blue and ruby lustre. In the middle, the Sacred Monogram yhs in Gothic characters.

Place of Origin

Gubbio (made)

Date

1510-1530 (made)

Artist/maker

Unknown

Materials and Techniques

Tin-glazed earthenware

Marks and inscriptions

'YHS'
monogram in centre of dish

Dimensions

Diameter: 21.7 cm, Height: 6.6 cm, Weight: 0.46 kg

Object history note

Soulages Collecton

Historical significance: By the thirteenth century, the lustring technique had spread through the Islamic world to southern Spain and gradually spread northward in to Christian territory. Active trade between the ports of Mansises and Pisa introduced lustreware to Italy and by the second half of the fifteenth century, the technique had been mastered by the potters at Deruta and shortly after at Gubbio. The former potteries specialised in a straw-coloured lustre, whereas the latter developed a rich ruby-coloured sheen. In this instance, the Islamic technique of lustring is juxtaposed with the Sacred Monogram.

By the thirteenth century, the lustring technique had spread through the Islamic world to southern Spain from where it gradually spread northward in to Christian territory. Active trade between the ports of Mansises and Pisa introduced lustreware to Italy and by the second half of the fifteenth century, the technique had been mastered by the potters at Deruta and shortly after at Gubbio. The former potteries specialised in a straw-coloured lustre, whereas the latter developed a rich ruby-coloured sheen. In this instance, the Islamic technique of lustring is juxtaposed with the Sacred Monogram.

Historical context note

During the eighth century Iraqi potters began to apply a lustring technique to their work. Taken from glass production, the lustre was created by applying metal compounds to the surface of a usually tin-glazed vessel, which was then submitted to a reduction firing. During this firing, the air supply was reduced and causing the resulting carbon monoxide to react with the metallic compounds converting them in to an irridescent film. Islamic lustre ware was imported in to Italy and can still be seen in the form of basins, or bacini, embedded in the walls of some churches.

Descriptive line

Earthenware plate, made in Gubbio, 1510-1520

Bibliographic References (Citation, Note/Abstract, NAL no)

Hess, C. The Arts of Fire: Islamic Influences on Glass and Ceramics of the Italian Renaissance. Los Angeles: The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2004
Rackham, B. Italian Maiolica. London: Faber & Faber, 1952

Materials

Tin-glazed earthenware

Techniques

Painting

Categories

Ceramics; Earthenware

Collection

Ceramics Collection

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