Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Request to view at the Prints & Drawings Study Room, level C

Quadrate werden rot

Plotter Drawing
1966 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Nake was among the first people to exhibit computer drawings as works of art, in Stuttgart in 1965. He is also considered to be one of the founding fathers of what we now think of as computer graphics. This work was produced using an algorithm written by the artist. Nake introduced random variables into the process, and could not fully predict the outcome.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Plotter drawing
Brief Description
Quadrate werden rot, plotter drawing, colour ink on paper, 1966, Frieder Nake. One of a set of four.
Physical Description
Red, pink, orange and green squares
Dimensions
  • Height: 28cm
  • Length: 21.8cm
Production typeUnique
Gallery Label
  • Chance and Control: Art in the Age of Computers (2018) FRIEDER NAKE (born 1938) Squares Turn Red (Quadrate Werden Rot) Germany, 1966 Frieder Nake was one of the first people to exhibit computer-generated images in a public gallery, with Georg Nees in Stuttgart in 1965. Nake wrote the algorithm used to create this series of plotter drawings. He introduced random variables into the process, and could not fully predict the outcome. Four plotter drawings Purchased with Art Fund support Museum nos. E.259 to E.262-2014(07/07/2018-18/11/2018)
  • Frieder Nake was one of the first people to exhibit computer drawings as works of art. This one was produced using an algorithm written by the artist. He introduced random variables into the process and could not fully predict the outcome.(01/01/2015)
Credit line
Purchased with Art Fund support
Summary
Nake was among the first people to exhibit computer drawings as works of art, in Stuttgart in 1965. He is also considered to be one of the founding fathers of what we now think of as computer graphics. This work was produced using an algorithm written by the artist. Nake introduced random variables into the process, and could not fully predict the outcome.
Collection
Accession Number
E.260-2014

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record createdMarch 4, 2014
Record URL