Not currently on display at the V&A

Silk Programme

1898 (printed)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

During the 18th and 19th centuries, silk and satin programmes were regularly produced to mark special evenings at theatre and given to members of the audience in the most expensive seats in the house. Interestingly, this playbill, printed by a printer in New Bond Street on watered silk, was produced for a concert featuring the contralto Miss Clara Butt (1872-1936) in the ballroom of a private house in London's Belgravia, 45, Pont Street.

45 Pont Street was built by the Charrington brewing family. It was an extremely wide a deep house, built on a double plot, with a grand ballroom on the first floor. Frederick Godman purchased a 99-year lease from the Charringtons some time around the turn of the century, and his wife Mrs. F. Du Cane Goodman hosted soirées there, although it is unclear whether the Goodmans had bought it by July 1898, the date of this concert. Clara Butt, who became Dame Clara Butt in 1920, was a star of the Royal Academy of Music where she trained in the early 1890s and became a favourite of royalty, singing in command performances for the Prince of Wales and Queen Victoria. She regularly supplemented her income in the late 1890s from the lucrative business of singing at private musical soirees like this during the London 'season', often performing at two or three different great houses on the same evening.


object details
Category
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Printed silk
Brief Description
Silk programme produced for a private concert featuring Miss Clara Butt, held in the ballroom of 45, Pont Street, London, SW3.
Physical Description
Silk programme printed on one side only in blue typography, with a tarnished silver metallic fringe attached all round. Headed with the address of the venue, 45 PONT STREET, SW, the date Sunday Evening, July 3rd, 1898, and a list of all the performers, their pieces and the composers. At the bottom, the name of the director is given, 'MR. WILLIAM GANZ, who will preside at the piano.'
Dimensions
  • Height: 38.0cm
  • Including fringe width: 25.3cm
  • Height: 32.7cm
  • Excluding fringe width: 20.0cm
Marks and Inscriptions
Object history
45, Pont Street was a private house built by the Charrington brewing family. It was an extremely wide a deep house, built on a double plot, with a grand ballroom on the first floor. Frederick Godman purchased a 99-year lease some time around the turn of the century and his wife Mrs. F. Du Cane Goodman would have hosted soirées there, although it is unclear whether the Goodmans had bought it by the date of this concert, July 1898.



The performers were Mons. Bonnard and Madame Plançon, Miss Clara Butt, Monsieur Saleza, Mlle. Marie Engle, Signor Ancona, Mme. Calvé, Mr. Ben Davies, Madame Emma Eames, Monsieur Hollman, Mr. W.L. Barrett, Monsieur Bonnard, Monsieur Johannes Wolff and Mlle. Meisslinger.
Summary
During the 18th and 19th centuries, silk and satin programmes were regularly produced to mark special evenings at theatre and given to members of the audience in the most expensive seats in the house. Interestingly, this playbill, printed by a printer in New Bond Street on watered silk, was produced for a concert featuring the contralto Miss Clara Butt (1872-1936) in the ballroom of a private house in London's Belgravia, 45, Pont Street.



45 Pont Street was built by the Charrington brewing family. It was an extremely wide a deep house, built on a double plot, with a grand ballroom on the first floor. Frederick Godman purchased a 99-year lease from the Charringtons some time around the turn of the century, and his wife Mrs. F. Du Cane Goodman hosted soirées there, although it is unclear whether the Goodmans had bought it by July 1898, the date of this concert. Clara Butt, who became Dame Clara Butt in 1920, was a star of the Royal Academy of Music where she trained in the early 1890s and became a favourite of royalty, singing in command performances for the Prince of Wales and Queen Victoria. She regularly supplemented her income in the late 1890s from the lucrative business of singing at private musical soirees like this during the London 'season', often performing at two or three different great houses on the same evening.
Collection
Accession Number
S.244-1987

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record createdSeptember 27, 2006
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